Navigation
Home Page

What we intend the pupils to learn

Year

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

EYFS first half term

SUPER ME (Autumn 1)

 

Stunning Starter - Finding out what a superhero is and making props to support play.

 

Marvellous Middle - Solving a mystery that required superhero skills!

 

Fabulous Finish - Super hero day

 

Role Play - House inside and outside initially then developed into a linked superhero role play based on children’s ideas

 

Author Focus - Allen Ahlberg

REACH FOR THE STARS (Spring 1)

 

Stunning Starter - Crash landing in the classroom from an alien friend.

 

Marvellous Middle - Rocket Launching

 

Fabulous Finish - Sending alien friend home in a new rocket.

 

Role Play - children’s ideas - space rocket and mission control

 

Author Focus - Oliver Jeffers

 

FOOD GLORIOUS FOOD (Summer 1)

 

Stunning Starter - Trip to Barleylands Farm linked to story of The Gingerbread Man

 

Marvellous Middle – Evil Pea captures some vegetables!

 

Fabulous Finish - Goldilocks arriving and knocking on the window

 

Role Play - children’s ideas - shop and restaurant

 

Author Focus - Julia Donaldson

 

Communication and Language

 

Communication and Language -

Develop listening and attention skills in small groups up to whole class for short sessions.

Understanding and following simple instructions to help build independence.

Develop children’s language skills to enable them retell past events, giving explanations and answering questions.

Building vocabulary through a wide variety of activities.

Communication and Language -

Maintain attention and concentrate during appropriate activities and in larger groups.

Follow stories without pictures or props.

Listen and respond to ideas expressed by others.

Extends vocabulary, exploring the meaning and sounds of new words.

Using language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences.

Communication and Language -

Listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and respond to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions.

Develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events.

Listen attentively with sustained concentration to follow a story without pictures or props and can listen in a larger group, for example, at assembly

Carry out instructions which contain several parts in a sequence.

Physical

Physical –

 

CLASSROOM: Develop fine motor skills through cooking, malleable and use of tools.

Explore mark making through a variety of media.

 

HEALTH AND SELF CARE

Dresses and undresses with help.

 

Gym: Through indoor PE sessions children become familiar with hall and PE expectation through exploring a variety of ways of traveling – slithering, shuffling, rolling, crawling, walking, running, jumping, skipping, sliding, hopping. This will then progress to allowing the children the opportunity to explore jumping and landing using apparatus. Children can travel with increasing confidence, as well as balance and climb equipment.

 

Physical –

 

CLASSROOM: Continue to form recognisable letters and begin to join the letters in digraphs during handwriting and phonics.

 

HEALTH AND SELF CARE

Dresses and undresses with increasing independence.

Show some understanding that good practices with regards to exercise, eating, sleeping and hygiene can contribute to good health.

Shows understanding of the need for safety when tackling new challenges, and considers and manages some risks.

 

Music and Movement: Through indoor PE sessions children develop skills in Music and Movement (Imaginative Space Travel).  Experiments with different ways of moving in order to complement the different aspects of space travel. Week one will focus on take-off, week two will focus on space exploration of the Moon and week three with focus on travelling back to earth. (3 weeks)

 

Cross Country: Children develop their running ability and stamina through Daily Mile and outdoor PE sessions. Children should be mindful of the need for arms and legs to work together. Children should be introduced to pacing in order to complete a longer race. They should end the unit by participating in school cross country race.

Physical –

 

CLASSROOM: Holds a pencil effectively and forms most letters correctly (at least half of the alphabet).

Become secure in their preferred hand for writing and hold a pencil using the correct pencil grip.

 

HEALTH AND SELF CARE

Dresses and undresses with some development towards managing buttons and zips.

Continue to learn about the importance for good health of physical exercise, and a healthy diet, and talk about ways to keep healthy and safe.

 

Balls: Through outdoor PE sessions children develop increasing control of a ball in pushing, patting, throwing, catching or kicking it. Children could progress to rolling and bouncing a ball and even be extended to using a bat and a ball simultaneously.

PSED

Personal, Social and Emotional Development –

Settling into the school environment and routines. 

Learning to access and play with resources and activities.

Make friends and building relationships with both children and adults.

Develop confidence in new social situations.

Learn to adapt behaviour and contribute towards a class charter.

 

These objectives are being supported through the Jigsaw PSED scheme of work.

 

Personal, Social and Emotional Development -

Play co-operatively, taking turns with others.

Develop confidence to try new activities and say why they like some activities more than others.

Develop awareness and understanding that their own actions affect other people.

 

These objectives are being supported through the Jigsaw PSED scheme of work.

 

Personal, Social and Emotional Development -

Talk about how they and others show feelings, talk about their own and others’ behaviour, and its consequences, and know that some behaviour is unacceptable.

Choose the resources they need for their chosen activities.

Develop confidence to speak in a familiar group about their ideas.

Take account of one another’s ideas about how to organise their activity.

 

These objectives are being supported through the Jigsaw PSED scheme of work.

Literacy

Literacy -

Learning new songs, rhymes and an introduction to some classic stories.

Talking about the way stories are structured and talking about settings events and characters.

Recognising print in the environment such as familiar names, signs and logos.

Introduce phonics and individual reading.

 

Literacy -

Segment the sounds in simple words and blend them together to aid reading and writing.

Start to learn the names of the letters of the alphabet.

Apply phonic skills to write words and simple sentences.

Begin to know that information can be retrieved from books and computers.

Represent some sounds correctly and in sequence

Know that they can write for different purposes e.g. lists.

Start to spell common regular words e.g. it, in, on, at (Phase 2 Letters and Sounds)

Literacy -

Read phonically regular words of more than one syllable as well as many irregular but high frequency words.

Read some common irregular words (from Letters and Sounds phases 2 and 3).

Can describe the main events in a simple story they have read.

Enjoys an increasing range of books.

Know that information can be retrieved from books and computer.

Demonstrate understanding when talking about what they have read.

Write simple sentences that can be read by themselves and others.

Maths

Mathematics -

Recognising numbers to twenty.

Counting objects accurately to ten.

Counting by rote beyond ten.

Naming 2D shapes and using shapes to create patterns and models.

Recognising repeating patterns.

Order by height and length (up to three).

Introduce concept of adding and taking away.

Mathematics -

Finding numbers that are one more or less than a given number up to ten.

Count forwards and backwards from different starting points.

Using equipment to find the total of items in two groups by counting all of them.

Adding and taking away with Numicon.

In practical activities and discussion, beginning to use the vocabulary involved in adding and subtracting.

Records, using marks that they can interpret and explain.

Begin to use mathematical names for ‘solid’ 3D shapes and mathematical terms to describe them.

Introduce the concept of doubling and halving using equipment.

Mathematics -

Counting and comparing using a pictogram.

Using quantities and objects, add and subtract two single-digit numbers and count on or back to find the answer.

Sharing amounts into equal groups.

Recognise, describe and know the value of coins from 1p up to £1.

Adding values of coins.

Measure items and distances using non-standard units of measure.

Introduce counting in 2s, 5s and 10s.

Solve practical problems that involve combining groups of 2, 5 and 10.

 

Understanding the World

Understanding the World -

Talking about significant events in our own experiences.

Know some of the things that make us unique and talk about similarities and difference.

Introduce daily discussions about the weather and the natural world.

Start to become familiar with technology within the classroom e.g. ipads, laptops, sound buttons

 

Introduce daily discussions about the weather and the natural world.

Know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things – through Autumn walk.

Look closely at similarities, differences and patterns and change (water and ice).

 

Understanding the World -

Learn about different festival taking part at this time of year e.g. Shrove Tuesday, Chinese New Year.

 

(this paragraph moved down to computing)

 

Finding out about seasonal change into winter.

Know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things through the topic of space – how astronauts stay healthy, rotting food experiment, rocket launching, waterproof materials.

 

Understanding the World -

Learn about different festival taking part at this time of year e.g. St. George’s Day, Pentecost

Continue to talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another.

Begin to know how the environment and living things are influenced by human activity.

Know that other children have different likes and dislikes and that they may be good at different things.

 

Observe the seasonal change into Summer – looking closely at similarities, differences, patterns and change.

Plant beans and cress, and observe how they grow and change.

Make observations of farm animals and explain why some things occur and talk about changes.

Expressive Arts and Design

Super Me and Let’s Celebrate

Area – drawing and painting

Media  - paint and clay (diva pots)

Artist – Jackson Pollock (firework link)

 

Self Portraits (Artist Focus – Leonardo Da Vinci ‘Mona Lisa’)

Explore colour mixing.

Media Focus - clay diva pots

Chooses particular colours to use for a purpose.

 

Reach for the Stars and Rumble in the Jungle

Area – textiles (weaving and sewing)

Media  – wool, thread, paper, range of textures

Artist  – Rousseau (Tiger in a Tropical Storm)

Media Focus – weaving and sewing.

Experiment to create different textures.

Create simple representations of events, people and objects.

Artist Focus – Rousseau (Tiger in a Tropical Storm)

Introduce a storyline or narrative into their play.

Represent their own ideas, thoughts and feeling through design and technology, art and music.

Food Glorious Food and Bug’s Life

Area – drawing, painting and collage - observational drawing (fruit/flowers)

Media Focus – pencil, paint, collage materials

Artist - Matisse ‘Snail’

Media Focus - observational drawing (fruit/flowers)

Safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.

Artist - Matisse – Snail

Develop their own ideas through selecting and using materials and working on processes that interest them.

Use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways, thinking about uses and purposes.

Computing

Computing -

Start to become familiar with technology within the classroom e.g. iPads, laptops, sound buttons.

 

Computing -

Learn how to take photos on an ipad.

Uses ICT hardware to interact with age-appropriate computer software.

 

Computing –

Becoming familiar with programmable toys through BeeBots.

Uses ICT hardware to interact with age-appropriate computer software.

 

 

RE –

To know that Christians pray.

To know that Harvest is a time to say thank you.

To know that some people want to thank God for their food.

(Participation in Harvest Festival)

 

Festivals

Diwali-To understand the Hindu festival of Diwali through Diva lamps.

Christmas -To understand the significance of Christmas for Christians?

Hanukkah-To appreciate the festival of Hannukah and its significance for Jews.

Compare similarities and differences between these three festivals of light

RE –

To know that Christians’ believe that God created the world.

To know that God’s name is special to Christians.

To know that God created humans to care for the world.

To think of ways that we could care for the world.

 

Festivals

Easter/Shrove Tuesday-How does Shrove Tuesday link to the Festival of Easter? How is Shrove Tuesday celebrated both now and in the past?

Chinese New Year- Where is this celebrated? How is this Celebrated? Also look at where China is to appreciate a different culture. Begin to understand how people from China celebrate in other countries outside China.

Holi- Understand why this festival of Holi is important to Hindus and the stories associated with this festival.

Mothering Sunday- Appreciate when Mothering Sunday began and recognise how servants visited their mothers once a year. Link to the Mother Church in each Parish.

 

Compare similarities and differences for each festival-focus on differences in culture.

RE –

To be able to retell some Old Testament stories through role-play, small world, story-telling and writing.

  • David & Goliath
  • Jonah & the Whale
  • Noah’s Ark

To learn the story of St. George and participate in celebrations.

Multi-cultural Week

 

Festivals

St George’s Day- explore how the Feast of St. George is celebrated in various churches. Make the link to being the Patron Saint of England.

Pentecost-Begin to make links to the Christian Faith and the significance of the Holy Spirit being sent to the followers of Jesus.

Eid-ul-Fitr- introduction to the Muslim faith-breaking the fast of Ramadan.

Match each festival to each religion which they have looked at over the whole year.

Can they explore a festival from Sikhism and Buddhism to complete their introduction to other faiths?

 

EYFS Second Half Term

LET’S CELEBRATE (Autumn 2)

 

Stunning Starter - Receive Elf on the Shelf

 

Marvellous Middle - Locating the Elf’s new hiding place every day and receiving letters/gifts from him.

 

Fabulous Finish - Infant Nativity to school and parents

 

Role Play - Shop inside and outside initially then developed to link to a Christmas themed role play, based on children’s ideas

 

Author Focus - Nicholas Allan

JUNGLE FUN (Spring 2)

 

Stunning Starter - Discover classroom decorated like a jungle.

 

Marvellous Middle - Travelling zoo comes to school with animals.

 

Fabulous Finish - Parents coming in for a Jungle/Easter themed afternoon

 

Role Play - children’s ideas - Jungle hideout and Jungle with animals

 

Author Focus - Giles Andereau

BUGS LIFE (Summer 2)

 

Stunning Starter - Letter from a ladybird who doesn’t know who her mummy is.  Can they help?

 

Marvellous Middle - Growing mini-beasts - ladybirds or butterflies

 

Fabulous Finish - Releasing our mini-beasts in Butterfly Meadow

 

Role Play - children’s ideas - discovery centre and camping

 

Author Focus - Eric Carle

Communication and Language

Communication and Language -

Introduce Talking Partners and the opportunity to share news.

Begin to maintain attention during focussed activities.

Attend assemblies and listen attentively in a range of situations.

Begin to follow more complex directions

Communication and Language -

Listen attentively in a range of situations.

Begin to answer how and why questions about their experiences and response to stories or events.

Link statements and stick to a main theme or intention.

Use talk to organise, sequence and clarify thinking, ideas, feelings and events.

Introduce a storyline or narrative into their play.

 

Communication and Language -

Give their attention to what others say and respond appropriately, while engaged in another activity.

After listening to stories children can express views about events or characters in the story and answer questions about why things happened.

Express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs.

 

Physical

Physical –

 

CLASSROOM: Start to form recognisable letters holding pencil effectively and learn the cursive script.

Begin to master use of one handed tools e.g. scissors

Begin to use anticlockwise movement and retrace vertical lines.

 

HEALTH AND SELF CARE

Dresses and undresses with help.

 

Dance: Through indoor PE sessions children develop skills in Dance. Children should learn to listen and appraise the music. They should listen carefully to different beats and rhythms in order to dance in time with the music and with other children. The dance is for the Christmas Nativity.

 

Physical –

 

CLASSROOM: Holds a pencil effectively and forms most letters correctly, particularly those in their own name.

Uses simple tools to effect changes to materials.

 

HEALTH AND SELF CARE

Dresses and undresses with increasing independence.

Eats a healthy range of foodstuffs and understands need for variety in food.

Shows understanding of how to transport and store equipment safely.

 

Throwing and Catching: Through indoor PE sessions children are introduced to handling beanbags. Children work towards throwing and catching bean bags in a more confined space, before moving outside next term where the children will move onto working with different balls. Children develop confidence to throw and catch a beanbag to themselves, progressing to throwing and catching successfully to a partner.

Physical –

 

CLASSROOM: Hold a pencil effectively and forms most letters correctly (most of the alphabet).

Know about and can make healthy choices in relation to healthy eating and exercise.

Become secure in their preferred hand for writing and hold a pencil using the correct pencil grip.

 

HEALTH AND SELF CARE

Dresses and undresses with some development towards managing buttons and zips.

 

Team Games: Through outdoor PE sessions children will prepare for Sports Day (School Games Day) activities.  Negotiate space successfully when playing racing and chasing games with other children, adjusting speed or changing direction to avoid obstacles. They should develop their co-ordination skills too with a variety of equipment.

PSED

Personal, Social and Emotional Development -

Reflect upon own abilities and describing self in positive terms through the use of pupil’s Learning Journey.

Participate in whole school events such as Infant Nativity, Christmas display in house day and fundraising events.

Encouraged to say when they do and don’t need help.

Explain own knowledge and understanding and ask appropriate questions.

 

These objectives are being supported through the Jigsaw PSED scheme of work.

Personal, Social and Emotional Development -

Show sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings and form positive relationships with adults and peers.

Take steps to resolve conflicts with other children on their own e.g. finding a compromise.

Begin to be able to negotiate and solve problems without aggression e.g. when someone has taken their toy.

 

These objectives are being supported through the Jigsaw PSED scheme of work.

Personal, Social and Emotional Development -

Prepare for transition into Year One.

Talk about the things they enjoy, and are good at, and about the things they don’t find easy.

Listen to each other’s suggestions and plan how to achieve an outcome without adult help.

Resolve minor disagreements through listening to each other to come up with a fair solution.

 

These objectives are being supported through the Jigsaw PSED scheme of work.

 

Literacy

Literacy -

Hearing initial, medial and end sounds in words.

Apply phonic skills to read words and simple sentences.

Build up a bank of sight vocabulary to use in reading and writing.

Write own name and other things such as labels and captions.

 

Literacy -

Segment the sounds in simple words and blend them together to aid reading and writing, including digraphs from Phase 3 Letters and Sounds.

Match lower and upper case letters of the alphabet.

Think of own ideas and form into a sentence.

Continue to represent some sounds correctly and in sequence

Know that they can write for different purposes e.g. postcards

Start to spell common irregular words e.g. no, go, I, to, the, into (Phase 2 Letters and Sounds) and CVC words e.g. cat, will, bag,

Literacy -

Demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read.

Apply knowledge of phonics when writing polysyllabic word.

Use phonic, semantic and syntactic knowledge to understand unfamiliar vocabulary.

Words are spelt correctly and other are phonetically plausible.

Begin to use key features of narrative in their own writing.

Demonstrate awareness of capital letters and full stops.

Maths

Mathematics -

Estimating how many objects and counting to check.

Finding numbers that are one more or less than a given number up to five.

Using the vocabulary involved in subtraction.

Becoming familiar with coins and learning their values.

Describing 2D shapes and positional language.

Adding using Numicon.

Exploring heavy and light objects and understanding how to use balancing scales.

 

Mathematics -

Count backwards from twenty.

Order numbers one to twenty and beyond.

Use quantities and objects to add and subtract two single-digit numbers.

Consolidating concept of addition and subtraction.

Compare numbers and identify which is more and less.

Become familiar with the concept of capacity and the associated language.

Sort items by own criteria e.g. 2D shapes

Comparing and ordering by height and length (more than three).

Measure height and length of objects using non-standard units of measure.

Identifying and matching patterns.

Mathematics -

Learn to recognise symmetry.

Explore patterns, shapes and tessellations.

Ordinal numbers.

Order days of the week.

Use everyday language related to time.

Learning to read o’clock times.

Revisit concept of doubling.

Repeated addition.

Adding parts to make a whole.

Subtraction and recording.

 

Understanding of the World

Understanding the World -

Learn about the different festivals that take place during this seasons e.g. Guy Fawkes, Diwali, Christmas, Hanukkah

Find out about animals that hibernate

 

Find out about animals which hibernate.

Know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things through day and night.

 

 

 

Understanding the World -

Learn about different festival taking part at this time of year e.g. Mother’s day, Easter.

Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions.

 

Observe the seasonal change into Spring - look closely at similarities, differences, patterns and change through animal patterns, exotic fruit tasting, travelling zoo visit, jungle layers, camouflage and food chains.

 

Understanding the World -

Observe seasonal change into Summer – looking closely at similarities, differences, patterns and change.

Learn about different festival taking part at this time of year e.g. Father’s Day

 

Make observations of minibeasts and explain why some things occur, and talk about changes through life cycles and habitats.

 

Expressive arts and design

Expressive Arts and Design -

Media Focus - clay diva pots

Builds a repertoire of songs and dances relating to Christmas.

Explore different songs of instruments linked to fireworks.

Constructs with a purpose in mind.

Chooses particular colours to use for a purpose.

Play co-operatively a part of a small group to act out a narrative.

Expressive Arts and Design -

Artist Focus – Rousseau (Tiger in a Tropical Storm)

Introduce a storyline or narrative into their play.

Explore the different sounds of instruments.

Sing songs, make music and dance, and experiment with ways of changing them.

Represent their own ideas, thoughts and feeling through design and technology, art and music.

 

Expressive Arts and Design -

Artist - Matisse – Snail

Develop their own ideas through selecting and using materials and working on processes that interest them.

Use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways, thinking about uses and purposes.

Talk about the ideas and processes that have led them to make music, design, images or products.

Computing

Computing -

Start to become familiar with technology within the classroom e.g. iPads, laptops, sound buttons.

 

Computing -

Learn how to take photos on an iPad.

Uses ICT hardware to interact with age-appropriate computer software

 

Computing -

Beebots - help ladybird to search for their mother.

Videoing – using iPads to record what found on hunt.

Make a choice of how to record minibeast – choose photo, video – select for a particular purpose.

RE

RE –

To know the difference between good and bad actions in a story (King of the Darkness).

To participate in and have some understanding of Remembrance Day.

To recognise that birthdays are special.

To recognise they have grown and changed.

To describe what makes them special and unique.

To recognise that Christians’ believe that everyone is special and unique.

To identify who was important in the Christmas story(Participate in school Nativity).

 

RE –

To know why a palm cross is a special symbol.

To know how crosses are used to celebrate Easter at home and at Church.

To know and describe the big surprise at the end of the Easter story.

To know that the cross is a symbol of forgiveness for Christians.

To know that Christians’ believe in helping those in need.

RE –

To be able to retell some New Testament stories through role-play, small world, story-telling and writing.

Making links between stories.

  • Feeding the 5,000
  • Jesus walks on water
  • Zacchaeus
  • Jesus heals a leper

Celebrating ‘Father’s Day’ and recognition of significant fathers in the Bible (Joseph, Noah, Jacob)

Year 1

TOY STORY

 

Stunning Starter – Teddy bears picnic

 

Marvellous Middle – visit to toy museum

 

Fabulous Finish – Puppet show to EYFS

 

Role Play – Teddy Bears picnic, Toy Story Andy’s bedroom and Stable in Bethlehem.

 

Visit –Valence House toy museum. Barking and Dagenham.

 

Author focus Jane Hissey, Jez Albrough

THE ADVENTURES OF PADDINGTON BEAR

 

Stunning Starter – Who is Paddington?

 

Marvellous Middle - Paddington sandwich making.

 

Fabulous Finish – Visit to Zoo link to animals of UK.

 

Role play – Transportation centres tourist office vary UK country.

 

Author Focus – Michael Bond, Nick Butterworth

 

JACK AND THE BEANSTALK

 

Stunning Starter – A Jack and the Beanstalk adventure.

 

Marvellous Middle - Trip to Thorndon Park/forest school

 

Fabulous Finish – Andy Goldsworthy art (with parents)

 

Role Play – Garden Centre

 

Visit -Butterfly meadow / Thorndon Park

 

Author Focus – Nick Sharratt, Lynley Dodd

 

English

English -

Narrative – stories based on ‘Toy Story’.

Poetry – Rhyme, Sound collector – Roger McGough

Instructions – linked to planting bulb for Mothering Sunday.

English -

Narrative -  Paddington adventures, Where the Wild Things Are

Information text – animals

Recount- zoo trip writing in past tense.

English -

Narrative – traditional tales (inc Jack and the Beanstalk), extended story writing, stories from other cultures

Information leaflet - plants

Poems – Seasons poetry

Maths

Mathematics -

Numbers to 20 ordering, writing and counting 1:1.

Number bonds to 10.

Addition and subtraction within 10 and 20.

Ordinal numbers

Directions left and right

Length comparing length and height.

Shapes and patterns

Mathematics -

Recap part, part, whole reasoning problems.

Numbers to 50.

Addition and subtraction building up methods and skills.

Multiplication counting in 2, 5, 10.

Division by sharing.

 Data Handling and graphs

Time

Mathematics -

Column addition, subtraction

money

Numbers to 100. – sequence, ordering

 

Mass, Volume, capacity

Time

Position and turns.

Science

Science –

Who am I? - to identify, name, draw and label basic parts of the human body.

Which part of body is associated with senses? Humans versus toys.

To describe and group properties of materials transparent, translucent, opaque, waterproof and flexible.

To distinguish between objects and materials from which it is made. ( toys from past)

Identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water and rock

Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials used in toys.

Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.

Investigate- materials to wrap a present. Modelling, teaching asking questions,

Science-

Creatures of the British Isles v animals in Peru - To name animals that are bird, fish, mammals.

Identify and name a variety of common animals including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.

To describe and compare the common structure of common invertebrates. To compare the structure

To name common animals that are carnivores, herbivores and omnivores.

Describe and compare the structure of a variety of common animals (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, including pets)

Protecting ourselves and the environment.

Animal living in sea and sand,

Seasonal changes

Child led investigation – What do creatures eat?

Science –

 

Plants:

Identify and name a variety of common, wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees.

Identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including trees.

 

Seasonal Changes:

Observe changes across the four seasons.

 

Child led investigation- What can I find out about plants?

Geography

Geography –

Toys around the world (Bk Children like Me.) Use world maps, Google earth, atlases and globes to countries, continents and oceans.

Africa, Central America, Russia, Germany and Australia.

Exploring different ways of celebrating Christmas around world and traditional toys.

Geography –

Name and locate characteristics for the 4 countries and capital cities of the UK and surrounding seas.

Identify seasonal changes and daily weather patterns in the UK and location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to Equator and Poles.

Geography –

geography in our school, its grounds and the surrounding area

Use google earth and explore aerial photos and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features: devise a simple map and use and construct basic symbols in a key.

History

History –

Changes within living memory. Inventors Steiff bears, Hornby. Looking a toys as a baby and now. Visit to toy museum

What toys do children of different ages play with?

What toys did you grandparents and parents play with?

Can you say how toys have changed over time?

History –

Explore how London has changed. Focus on capital cities and industries. e.g river Thames, shipping, coal mines. Historical landmarks- Stonehenge, Hadrian’s Wall.

Why are landmarks important to the local area and country?

How transport has changed over time?

 

History –

Lives of significant individuals in the past, compared to life in different periods Darwin and Liz Bonnin.

Art

Toy story

Area Painting (colour mixing) toys of the future

Media – paint

Artist focus – Walt Disney

The Adventures of Paddington

 Area - Sculpture of Paddington Bear

Media – clay

Artist focus – Marcus Cornish

Roots and shoots/Jack and the Beanstalk

Area – Drawing, painting and collage

Media – pencil, paint and collage materials

Artist focus – Van Gogh

DT

DT –

Puppets (textiles) - Select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks such as cutting, shaping, joining and finishing.

Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates. (Designing puppets).

DT - 

Food technology – Investigate different breads, and fillings, link to diet and health.

Use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to plan, prepare, evaluate sandwiches.

DT –

Investigate simple pulley system at forest schools and in role play area.  Design, make and evaluate a mechanism for Jack to lower the golden egg, harp and money down the bean stalk.

 

Music

Music -

Introduce glockenspiels and chime bars. Hey You-

Listen to and appraise different styles of music., learn to sing adding percussion instrument to the beat and rhythm of the song. Improving with different sounds using instruments.

Learn about the glockenspiel and chime bars, playing in time and rhythm.

 

Christmas nativity – singing skills focus on singing as part of a group being aware of volume and speed.

 

Music -

Developing glockenspiels and chime bars. Building upon glockenspiel skill and being apply to play along to a tune understanding simple notation and the opportunity for improvisation.

Round and Round- Listen to and appraise different styles of music., learn to sing adding percussion instrument to the beat and rhythm of the song. Improving with different sounds using instruments.

 

Easter- singing skills focus on singing as part of a group being aware of volume and speed.

Music

Banana Rap (rhythm in the way, In the groove)

Singing focus on rhythm, pace and harmony with other singers.

 

Drumming and use of percussion instruments exploring sound, pitch and tempo to create sound effects for parts of the Jack and the Beanstalk story for performance and appraisal of others compositions.

 

PE

Toy Story

INDOOR

Mighty Movers: explore running at a variety of speeds and in a variety of styles; run at different speeds and in different directions with control; understand the purpose of a circuit and how it can improve fitness; explore running at different speeds.

 

Boot Camp: understand how to prepare the body for exercise, understand what fitness means; complete a range of circuit-based activities and understand the reason for doing them, understand what happens to the heart rate during exercise; complete a circuit that includes activities practices with balance and co-ordination.

 

OUTDOOR

Story Time Dance: change direction during travelling moves, link travelling moves that change direction and level; link moves together, use a variety of moves; explore basic body patterns and movements to music; use a variety of moves that change speed and direction; link together dance moves with gestures and changing direction in time to music.  

 

Multi-Skills: explore static balancing and understand the concept of bases; combine a number of co-ordination drills, using upper and lower body movements; aim a variety of balls and equipment accurately, time running to stop or intercept the path of a ball; travel in different ways, showing clear transitions between movements; travel in different directions (side to side, up and down) with control and fluency; practise ABC (agility, balance and co-ordination) at circuit stations.

The Adventures of Paddington

INDOOR

Gymfit Circuits: identify techniques to improve balance; practise a range of gymnastic skills through a series of circuits; perform a range of gymnastic skills with increased accuracy; perform a sequence of gymnastic moves within a circuit; perform a sequence of moves at each station within a circuit with increased accuracy; evaluate my performance of gymnastic moves within a circuit.

 

Groovy Gymnastics: explore movement actions with control and link them together with flow; explore gymnastic actions and shapes; explore travelling on benches; explore movement actions with control, and to link them together with flow; choose and use simple compositional ideas by creating and performing sequences, repeat and link combination of gymnastic actions, link combinations of movements and shapes with control.

 

OUTDOOR

Skip to the Beat: develop foot patterns that aid skipping; develop skipping skills; improve agility, balance and co-ordination.

 

Brilliant Ball Skills (Football): master basic sending and receiving techniques, develop balance, agility and co-ordination; make use of co-ordination, accuracy and weight transfer; develop receiving skills; use ball skills in game-based activities.

Jack and the Beanstalk

INDOOR

Cool Core (Strength): identify techniques to improve core strength and agility; learn how to support body weight; perform movements which demonstrate core control; work through ladder activities to improve co-ordination and accuracy; use core to improve balance whilst running; support body weight on hands using the core muscles; demonstrate good posture and balance; learn the front and back support.

 

Fitness Frenzy: complete a circuit that includes activities learned throughout the year; explore running at different speeds; improve agility, balance and co-ordination; evaluate performance of gymnastic moves within a circuit; identify techniques to improve core strength and agility; use techniques already learned to improve performance.

 

OUTDOOR

Throwing and Catching (Field Games): 3 Tees Cricket – learn skills for striking and fielding games; practise basic striking, sending and receiving; use throwing and catching skills in a game; practise accuracy of throwing and consistent catching; strike with a racket or bat; play a game fairly and in a sporting manner, use fielding skills to play a game. 

 

Active Athletics: use varying speeds when running; explore footwork patterns; to explore arm mobility, explore different methods of throwing; practise short distance running; practise taking off from different positions; complete an obstacle course with control and agility.

RE

RE –

Christianity

God and Creation story. – Who made the world?

Incarnation – Christmas Why is Christmas important for Christians.

Harvest, Remembrance

Christian Values

Bible story – Daniel and the Lions Den. (OT)

Flower of Faiths

Symbols and People

A basic introduction to the 6 main religions including Christianity (not a focus), Buddhism- Buddha, Sikhism-Guru Nanak, Judaism- Moses, Islam- Muhammad

What do I know about key figures from different religions?

Name key figures from each religion.

Retell a story about a key person

How has the person influenced the religion?

How is the person celebrated/ worshipped?

RE –

Christianity

Incarnation – Christmas Why is Christmas important for Christians. Epiphany

Salvation- Why does Easter matter to Christians

St Georges day

Christian Values

 Bible story – Story of Joseph (OT)

Jesus calling disciples (NT)

Flower of Faiths

How do they worship?

Place of worship Mosque, temple, Gurdwara, Synagogue, shrines

Important elements

Days of worship

Worship leaders

How do different faiths congregate and worship?

Name different places of worship

Compare different places of worship

How is the place used during worship?

How place is the place of worship used within festivals?

Key places around the world focus for pilgrimages? e.g. Mecca. Jerusalem.

RE –

Christianity

Pentecost

Celebrating other Faiths - Sikhism

Christian Values

 Bible story – Prodigal Son ( NT)

Wise and foolish man (NT)

The Sower (NT)

Flower of Faiths

Special Books

How it’s treated, written, displayed, names, appearance.

Torah, Quran, Veda, Guru Granth Sahib.

Stories from other faiths and cultures.

How are special books and texts used?

Name special books for each religion.

Identify how it is written and treated

Retell story or event from holy text

Compare key texts identifying similarities within stories.

How is the text used within every day religious practises?

PSHE

PSHE –

Being Me in My World

Celebrating difference: ways I am different from my friends, understand these differences make us all special and unique

 

PSHE –

Dreams and Goals: how I felt when I succeeded in a new challenge and how I celebrated, how to store the feelings of success in my internal treasure chest

Healthy Me: why I think my body is amazing and can identify some ways to keep it safe and healthy, recognise how being healthy helps me to feel happy

PSHE –

Relationships: why I appreciate someone who is special to me and express how I feel about them

Changing Me: identify the parts of the body that make boys different to girls and can use the correct names for these, respect my body and understand which parts are private

Computing

Computing –

E-safety, reminder of rules

We are treasure hunters

Children are introduced to problem solving and what an algorithm is. They create their own sequence of movements and then have to solve a ‘given code bug’.

 

Final product: Beebots- programming

 

Computing –

E-safety, reminder of rules

We are collectors

Children use web search engines to collect pictures of different types of animals. They explore how pictures can be put in Powerpoint and then have text added.

 

Final product: PowerPoint creating a page which includes text and pictures

Computing –

E-safety reminder of rules

We are painters

Children are able to make their own digital content. They are making it using paint software to create and manipulate digital content.

 

Final product: Creating own picture in paint and adding text to the digital media.

Year 2

THE GREAT FIRE OF LONDON

 

Stunning Starter – The story of the Great Fire of London and bread making

 

Marvellous Middle – Great Fire of London ‘hands on learning’ History off the Page

 

Fabulous Finish – Animated ICT film of Great Fire of London

 

Role play - Pudding Lane Bakery

 

Visit – History off the page ‘the Great Fire of London’

 

Author Focus – Anthony Browne and Mini Grey

CHOCOLATE

 

Stunning Starter - Chocolate tasting!

 

Marvellous Middle – Aztec art

 

Fabulous Finish – Egg destroyer

 

Role Play -  The Chocolate Factory (from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory)

 

Visit - Drumming workshop (Aztec link)

 

Author Focus – Michael Foreman and Helen Cooper

 

PIRATES

 

Stunning Starter - Watch Pirates in an adventure cartoon

 

Marvellous Middle- visit/pirate day

 

Fabulous Finish - Year 2 End of Year production

 

Role play - Pirate ship (counting treasure)

 

Visit – Chatham Docks pirate day

 

Author Focus – Timothy Knapman and Jeanne Willis

English

English –

Narrative – based on Silly Billy by Anthony Browne (author focus) and Great Fire of London

Diary writing – based on the events in the Great Fire of London

Poetry – focus on ‘Really Looking’ emotive language, poetry based in fire and fireworks

English –

Narrative writing - Charlie and the Chocolate Factory themed story

Poetry – based on descriptive language

Non-Fiction texts – explanatory writing based on one of the sweets from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (eg checking for bad nuts).

English –

Narrative story writing –‘The Man Whose Mother was a Pirate by Margaret Mahy, pirate adventures, ‘Mungo and the Pirate’ Adventures

Poetry – sea shanties

Non-fiction – pirate fact finding, writing a ship’s log

Instructions – to make a vile meal for a pirate to enjoy

Maths

Mathematics –

Count in steps of 2, 3 and 5 from 0 and in tens from any number, forward and backward.

Place value of each digit in a two digit number (tens, ones), solving problems

Identify, read, write, represent and estimate numbers to 100 using different representations including the number line.

Compare and order numbers from 0 up to 100; use <, > and = signs.

Recall and use addition and subtraction facts to 20 fluently, and derive and use related facts up to 100.

Show that the addition of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and subtraction of one number from another cannot.

Add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including: a two digit number and ones; a two digit number and tens; two two digit numbers; adding three one digit numbers.

Recognise and use the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction and use this to check calculations and solve missing number problems.

Solve problems with addition and subtraction: using concrete objects and pictorial representations, including those involving numbers, quantities and measures; applying their increasing knowledge of mental and written methods.

Recognise and use symbols for pounds and pence. Combine amounts to make a particular value. Find different combinations of coins that equal the same amounts of money. Solve simple problems in a particular context involving addition and subtraction of money of the same unit, including giving change.

Mathematics –

Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 times tables, including recognising odd and even numbers.

Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (×), division (÷) and equals (=) signs.

Solve problems involving multiplication and division, using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods and multiplication and division facts, including problems in contexts.

Show that the multiplication of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and division of one number by another cannot.

Geometry- properties of shape

Identify and describe the properties of 2D shapes, including the number of sides and line symmetry in a vertical line.

Identify and describe the properties of 3D shapes, including the number of edges, vertices and faces.

Identify 2D shapes on the surface of 3D shapes, [for example, a circle on a cylinder and a triangle on a pyramid.]

Compare and sort common 2D and 3D shapes and everyday objects.

Order and arrange combinations of mathematical objects in patterns and sequences.

Use mathematical vocabulary to describe position, direction and movement, including movement in a straight line and distinguishing between rotation as a turn and in terms of right angles for quarter, half and three-quarter turns (clockwise and anti-clockwise)

Recognise, find, name and write fractions 13, 14, 24 and 34 of a length, shape, set of objects or quantity.

Write simple fractions for example, ½ of 6 = 3

Recognise the equivalence of 24 and 12.

Measurement – height and length.

Mathematics –

Locate, order and compare 2-digit numbers on 0-100 landmarked lines and on the 1-100 square; use < and > signs; locate numbers on an empty 0-100 line; introduce numbers 101 to 200 and count in 100s to 1000; add 2-digit numbers by counting on in 10s and 1s; subtract 2-digit numbers by counting back in 10s and 1s

Challenge use these digits to make a number. What combinations can you make and compare them.

Multiplication and relationship with divisions and remainders (SAT style questions)

1 step and 2 step problems

Division and multiplication 2, 5, 10 - Simple number sentences as well as word problems.

Measure weight using standard or uniform non-standard units; draw a block graph where one square represents two units; weigh items using 100g weights using scales marked in multiples of 1kg or 100g; measure capacity using uniform non-standard units; measure capacity in litres and in multiples of 100ml

Venn, Carroll and tree diagrams

Reading scales divisions of 1, 2, 5,10

Complex missing number problems where both sides of sum must equal. Addition and subtraction.

Multiplication and relationship with divisions and remainders

 

 

Science

Science-

 

Uses of everyday materials:

 

Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses.

 

Find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching. 

 

 

Science investigation: Investigation based on the properties of materials.

Science –

 

(Animals including humans)

Notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults.

 

Describe how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals, using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food.

 

Find out about and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air) [related to pets]

 

Describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene [link with the main theme]. 

Science Investigation based on food and exercise 

 

 

Investigative skills (Child led)

Children to come up with their own questions and then plan their own investigation.

 

 

Science –

 

(Living things and their habitats) Explore and compare the difference between things that are living, dead and thing that have been alive.

 

Identify that most living things live in habitats to which they are suited and describe how different habitats provide for the basic needs of different kinds of animals and plants, and how they depend on each other [related to mini-beasts].

 

Identify and name a variety of plants and animals in their habitats, including microhabitats

 

 

(Plants) Observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants

 

find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy

 

Science investigation: Investigation based on the living conditions of plants

Geography

Geography –

Expansion of London/Thames before and after the fire

Name, locate and identify characteristics of the 4 countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.  Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features.

 

Geography –

understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the UK, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country [Ghana village to UK - produces cocoa beans in Ghana], name and locate the world’ seven continents and five oceans

 

Geography -

Key physical features that Pirates would encounter (eg beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather); use world maps, atlases and globes, to identify the UK and its countries, as well as countries, continents and oceans; use simple compass directions and (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language (eg near and far; left and right to describe the location of features and routes on a map

History

History –

Great Fire of London: significant historical events in our own locality and events beyond living memory that are significant nationally

Link with Yr 1 – Paddingtons – looking at key building and use of river Thames.

 

What happened to London during the fire of 1666?

What was Stuart London like?

Could anyone have stopped what happened on 2 September 1666?

What did people do first?

What was it like at the height of the fire?

What was left of London?

What did the King do to make London better?

History –

link with Aztecs - To understand the nature of expansion and dissolution of empires.  To identify similarities and differences between ways of life in areas of the world (Aztecs v Spanish).

 

Who are the Aztecs?

 Why did the Aztecs move around?  Why did they choose the site for their city? 

How did the everyday lives of Aztecs differ to our own?

What was the importance of chocolate to the Aztecs?

History –

Lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements.  compared to life in different periods – Christopher Columbus, Grace O’Malley, Blackbeard

Can I mind map what I know about pirates?

Art

Great Fire of London

Area – Painting and collage, creating a ‘relief’ of the Great Fire

Media – paint and collage

Artist focus – Ben Johnson

Chocolate

Area - Printing

Media – stencilling, press printing

Artist focus – Aztec art

Pirates

Area – Textiles

Media – sewing and batik

Artist focus – Elisa Quevedo

DT

DT –

Bread baking – investigate different breads and dietary strengths/weaknesses, use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes.

understand where food comes from and investigate how methods of baking have changed between great fire of London time and now.

Big focus on evaluations, children compare the bread they have made to other pre-made bread

 

DT –

Using links with Ford, children will design, make and evaluate cars which move and will be designed for Umpa Lumpas to get around the chocolate factory.

Explore and evaluate a range of existing products, then design a car from a show box, with dowelling and wooden wheels. A lot of work will be done on measuring and discussions  of accuracy so the car can move straight. Ford engineers will come in to assist and will choose winning groups. Children will then take their cars to Ford to enter a competition against other schools.

DT –

Pneumatics- children to create sharks using a pneumatic system where the sharks open their mouths.

 

Music

Music –

I Want to Play in a Band - applying the key concepts of finding a pulse, clapping a rhythm, pitch, playing accompanying instrumental parts.

Ho, Ho, Ho- Christmas music and songs based on the theme of this time of the year.

 

Music –

Hands, feet, heart- listening and appraisal, applying key concepts of style of African music, composing their own music in the relevant style.

Zoo time’ – listen and appraise, discuss tyle and structure, pulse, pitch and rhythm, learn a song and add instrumental parts, compose simple musical piece, improvise music and performance

Music-

Friendship song- listening and appraisal, applying key concepts of finding a pulse, clapping a rhythm, pitch, playing accompany instrumental parts, including composing their own musical piece.

 

Reflect, rewind and replay – listening and appraisal, applying key concepts of finding a pulse, clapping a rhythm, pitch, playing accompany instrumental parts, including improvisation and own composition

PE

Great Fire of London

INDOOR

Boot Camp: understand how to prepare the body for exercise, understand what fitness means; complete a range of circuit-based activities and understand the reason for doing them; understand what happens to the heart rate during exercise; complete a circuit that includes activities practised; complete a circuit with balance and co-ordination.

 

Ugly Bug Ball Dance: explore different levels and speeds of movement; compose and perform simple dance phrases, show contrasts in simple dances with good body shape and position; develop a range of dance movements and improve timing; work to music, creating movements that show rhythm and control.

 

OUTDOOR

Mighty Movers (Running): run efficiently using the arms; demonstrate running with balance and co-ordination; understand the purpose of a circuit and how it can improve fitness.

 

Multi-Skills: explore static balancing, understand concepts of bases; combine a number of co-ordination drills, using upper and lower body movements; aim a variety of balls and equipment accurately; travel in different ways, showing clear transitions between movements; maintain balance when changing direction; use skills learned in a game.

Chocolate

INDOOR

Groovy Gymnastics: remember and repeat simple gymnastic actions with control; balance on isolated parts of the body using the floor and hold balance; develop a range of gymnastic moves; particularly balancing; link together a number of gymnastic actions into a sequence; explore ways of travelling around on large apparatus; choose and use a variety of gymnastic actions to make a sequence.

 

Gymfit Circuits: identify techniques to improve balance; practise a range of gymnastic skills through a series of circuits; perform a range of gymnastic skills with increased accuracy; perform a sequence of gymnastic moves within a circuit; perform a sequence of moves at each station within a circuit with increased accuracy; evaluate performance of gymnastic moves within a circuit.

 

OUTDOOR

Skip to the Beat: perform skipping moves with agility, balance and co-ordination; explore different ways of jumping/hopping with balance and accuracy; skip with control and balance.

 

Brilliant Ball Skills (Basketball): use hand-eye co-ordination to control a ball, catch a variety of objects; vary types of throw, move with a ball, develop catching and dribbling skills; use ball skills in a mini festival.

Pirates

INDOOR

Cool Core (Strength): develop and improve core strength and agility; learn how to maintain a good bridge using core strength; improve plank techniques; maintain a wheelbarrow walk for a longer period of time; perform a crunch and understand what it does; perform an activity/game which uses the abdominals; perform a squat and diagonal body twist and understand why they are valuable exercises to do; footwork patterns using a hoop; develop hoop skills that will aid core strength and balance.

 

Fitness Frenzy: complete a circuit of activities; understand the purpose of a circuit and how it can improve fitness; skip with control and balance; improve core strength, balance and agility; evaluate performance of gymnastic moves within a circuit. 

 

OUTDOOR

Throwing and Catching (3 Tees Cricket): learn skills for playing striking and fielding games; position the body to strike a ball, practise striking a small ball; develop catching skills; throw a ball for distance; practise throwing skills in circuit; play a game fairly and in a sporting manner, use fielding skills to play a game.

 

Active Athletics: run with agility and confidence; learn the best jumping techniques for distance; throw different objects in a variety of ways; hurdle an obstacle and maintain an effective running style; run for distance; complete an obstacle course with control and agility.

RE

RE –

Christianity

Creation – learn about the week of creation, looking after God’s creation, how would God feel about how our world is looked after, how can Christians look after the world, what rules might God create to look after our world?

Incarnation

Why is Jesus special to Christians?

What makes a good king?  Three gifts the kings gave and their symbolism.

Reflecting on the life that Jesus would lead and what Christians learn from this, what gifts can we give to others?

Islam

Learn about what is means to be a Muslim through birth ceremonies, weddings and how they dress (Ihram-2 pieces of plain white cloth worn during pilgrimage to Mecca)

Stories about Muhammed and animals-e.g. Muhammed is saved by a spider, Muhammed and a nesting dove, Muhammed and the thirsty camel, Muhammed and the ants.

Story of creation-Muslims believe that signs of Allah’s creation are seen in the natural world.

Crescent Moon- symbol

Qiblah compass-to show direction of Mecca.

Clocks to show prayer times. Pictures of the Ka’bah.

RE

Christianity

Gospel – what is the good news Jesus brings? Stories from the Bible showing link with concept of ‘Gospel’ or ‘Good News’, what Bible texts mean to Christians, Jesus gives instructions for how people should behave (forgiveness and peach and brining Good News to the friendless), how Christians put Jesus’ teaching into practice

Parables of the lost sheep, prodigal son, paralysed man and Zacchaeus

Salvation – Why does Easter matter to Christians? Recognise incarnations and salvation are part of a ‘Big Story’ of the Bible, Stories of the Holy Week and Easter from the Bible, what Christians learn from them and their link with salvation.  How Christians show their beliefs about Jesus’ death and resurrection in church worship at Easter. What does the story of Easter say to Christians about sadness, hope or heaven? 

Sikhism

Stories about the young Guru Nanak e.g. Nanak and the mysterious shadow, Nank and te cows, Nanak and the snake (avoid those looked at in Year 1)

Naming Ceremonies. Amrit Pahul/Amrit Sanskar

Festivals- Divali/Bani Chhorh Divas Sikh festival of light. (celebrating how Guru Har Gobind rescued 52 princes from imprisonment)

The Gurdwara-a place of worship and The Golden Temple in Amritsar.

How the gurdwara is used as a community centre as well as a place of worship.

RE –

Christianity

Pentecost – Mementos are given to people to remind them of special people or times, how do you remember people? What gift would you give to a friend who you are not going to see for a long time? Understand why Jesus sent the Holy Spirit to his friends after he had left them.  Story of Ascension.  How do Christians believe the Holy Spirit could help people?

 

PSHE

PSHE –

Being Me in My World

Celebrating difference: identify some ways in which my friend is different from me, why I value this difference about him/her

PSHE –

Dreams and Goals: explain some of the ways I worked cooperatively in my group to create the end product, express how it felt to be working as part of this group

Healthy Me: make some healthy snacks and explain why they are good for my body, express how it feels to share healthy food with my friends

PSHE –

Relationships: identify some of the things that cause conflict between me and my friends, demonstrate how to use the positive problem solving technique to resolve conflicts with my friends

Changing Me: recognise the physical differences between boys and girls, use the correct names for parts of the body and appreciate that some parts of my body are private, tell you what I like/don’t like about being a boy/girl

Computing

Computing –

E-Safety rules and reminders

We are photographers

Children will be using technology to create and manipulate digital content. They will be making a stop motion animation using imovie and windows move maker to make a short film about the great fire of London.

 

Final Product: Short film using movie making apps.

 

Final product: Create a stop motion movie on imovie

 

Computing –

E-Safety rules and reminders

The children will use Scratch JNr to explore what blocks do by carrying out an informative cycle of predict>test>review. They will programme a familiar story and an animation of an animal, make their own musical instrument by creating buttons and recording sounds and follow an algorithm to record a joke.

.

Computing –

E-Safety rules and reminders

We are zoologists

Children will go on a bug hunt, recording and identifying the small animals they find. They will organise the data they have collected, record it using Excel and interpret the graph to answer questions about the animals.

 

Final product: Create a branching data base and graph (Excel).

 

Final product: Create an excel graph from inputted data.

Year 3

EXCITING EGYPTIANS

 

Stunning Starter – Make a Mummy

 

Marvellous Middle – Egyptian day

 

Fabulous Finish – Christmas production

 

Role play – Tutankhamun’s tomb (sarcophagus, Egyptian wall paintings, archaeologists)

 

Visit - Egyptian day

 

Author Focus: Roald Dahl and Quentin Blake

 

RAMPAGING ROMANS

 

Stunning Starter – Gladiator fights and chariot racing

 

Marvellous Middle – Roman Feast

 

Fabulous Finish – Colchester Castle Trip

 

Role play – The Roman Forum

 

Visit- Colchester Castle Trip

 

Author Focus: Liz Pichon and Francesca Simon

 

SHENFIELD ST MARY’S CHURCH OF ENGLAND PRIMARY SCHOOL

 

Stunning Starter – Treasure Hunt

 

Marvellous Middle – Local area walk

 

Fabulous Finish – Fashion show where children present information on the 1960s, showcasing their Flower Power pastel pictures and their tie-dye t-shirts.

 

Role Play – Victorian Classroom

 

Visit – Local Area walk, how has it changed over the years? Geography focus.

 

Author Focus: Lewis Carroll and Philippa Pearce

English

English – 

Narrative – familiar settings

Storm by Kevin Crossley-Holland. Children look at familiar settings, particularly at the sights and sounds. Look at settings and how they affected during different seasons.

Instructions – How to Make a Mummy

The children watch a combination of YouTube clips to learn about the process of mummification (Humanities link) SPAG focus is imperative verbs and time connectives. Children use these to create their own instructions from a comic strip they have written prior to the writing stage.

Non-fiction – Who Killed Tutankhamen?

Who Killed Tutankhamen? (Active Learn)

Study the historic versus the scientific sources to try and answer the question. Historic evidence shows that Tutankhamun may have been disabled from birth and some scientific CT scans show that he broke his leg before or just after his death.

Poetry: Performance Poetry

Link to Revolting Rhymes by Roald Dahl. Children learn all six rhymes, completing various tasks e.g. a wanted poster for Goldilocks, a comic strip for the Three Little Pigs or comprehension tasks for Little Red Riding Hood and Cinderella. The children then create their own ‘revolting rhyme character.’ They learn an extract of rhyming couplets in groups to perform.

English –

Narrative – link to topic

Romans on the Rampage by Jeremy Strong.

This tells the tale of boy who always dreams of being a chariot racer in the Colosseum. His dreams come true sooner than he ever imagined.

Poetry: Shape Poems

Children to explore drawing calligrams. They then could explore the gladiator arenas through the senses. Children to write a shape poem based on gladiators.

Information Texts

Children to write an information text on daily life as a Roman (social hierarchy, food, buildings, famous event – gladiator fighting, chariot racing.)

Letters

Children to write a letter from the Emperor requesting for more gladiators in order for his entertainment. The Emperor wants to remain popular with his people but must also outline what the job really entails. The letter should, above all, be persuasive.

 

 

English –

Myths and Legends

Write a myth or legend about how the Stone Age people created the wheel.

Could potentially look at ‘Early Man’ the film for inspiration?

 

Dialogue and Plays

Script based on Doctor Who.

Who would Doctor Who meet as he came out of his Tardis? New Companion?

 

 

Maths

Mathematics –

Number: Place Value

Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations.

Find 10 or 100 more or less than a given number

Recognise the place value of each digit in a three-digit number (hundreds, tens, ones).

Compare and order numbers up to 1000.

Read and write numbers up to 1000 in numerals and in words.

Solve number problems and practical problems involving these ideas.

Count from 0 in multiples of 4,

8, 50 and 100

Number: Addition and Subtraction

Add and subtract numbers mentally, including: a three-digit number and ones; a three-digit number and tens; a three-digit number and hundreds.

Add and subtract numbers with up to three digits, using formal written methods of columnar

addition and subtraction.

Estimate the answer to a calculation and use inverse operations to check answers.

Solve problems, including missing number problems, using number facts, place value,

and more complex addition and

subtraction.

Number Multiplication and Division

Write and calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division using the multiplication tables and fact they know, including two digit numbers by a one-digit number for both multiplication and division, using mental progressing to written formats and methods.

Mathematics –

Money

Add and subtract amounts of money to give change in £ and p in practical contexts.

Statistics

Interpret and present data using bar charts, pictograms and tables.

Solve one-step and two-step questions using information presented in bar charts, pictograms and tables.

Measurement – Length and Perimeter

Measure, compare, add and subtract: lengths (m/cm/mm); mass (kg/g); volume/capacity (l/ml).

Measure the perimeter of simple 2D shapes.

Fractions

Count up and down in tenths; recognise that tenths arise from dividing an objects into ten equal parts and in dividing one-digit numbers or quantities by 10.

Recognise and use fractions as numbers: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators.

Recognise, find and write fractions of a discrete set of objects: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators.

Solve problems which include the aforementioned.

Mathematics –

Fractions

Count up and down in tenths; recognise that tenths arise from dividing an objects into ten equal parts and in dividing one-digit numbers or quantities by 10.

Recognise and use fractions as numbers: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators.

Recognise, find and write fractions of a discrete set of objects: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators.

Solve problems which include the aforementioned.

Measurement: Time

Tell and write the time from an analogue clock, including using Roman numerals from I to XII and 12-hour and 24-hour clocks.

Estimate and read time with increasing accuracy to the nearest minute.

Record and compare time in terms of seconds, minutes and hours.

Use vocabulary such as o’clock, a.m./p.m., morning, afternoon, noon and midnight.

Know the number of seconds in a minute and the number of days in each month, year and leap year.

Compare durations of events [for example to calculate the time taken by particular events or tasks].

Geometry: Properties of Shape

Recognise angles as a property of shape or a description of a turn.

Identify right angles, recognise that two right angles make a half-turn, three make three quarters of a turn and four a complete turn; identify whether angles are greater than or less than a right angle.

Identify horizontal and vertical lines and pairs of perpendicular and

parallel lines.

Draw 2-D shapes and make 3-D shapes using modelling materials.

Recognise 3-D shapes in different orientations and describe them.

Measurement: Mass and Capacity

Measure, compare, add and subtract: lengths (m/cm/mm); mass (kg/g); volume/capacity (l/ml)

Science

Science –

Teeth and Eating -  Child led investigation

 

To classify and identify different types of teeth and their functions.

To recognise why and how we must take good care of our teeth.

 

To make observations and form conclusions.

To understand the effect of advertising on the public about oral hygiene and cleaning of teeth.

To study the effects of tooth decay.

To describe the function of parts of the human digestive system.

To make observations and record finding using scientific language and labelled diagrams.

To create a digestive system using everyday items which would mimic the organs and replicate various processes needed for digestion.

To recognise what a food chain represents.

To construct and interpret a variety of food chains.

To identify producers, predators and prey.

Food and Our Bodies

To find out about healthy and balanced diets.

To gather, record and present data in different ways.

To compare the diets of different animals.

To study the effects of fats and sugars on our bodies.

To understand the locations of our bones are within our bodies.

To look at joints and how bones and muscles help us move.

To make systematic and careful observations.

To compare human skeletons with those of animal skeletons and exoskeletons.

To understand how muscle work in pairs.

Science –

Mirror, Mirror – Child led investigation

To describe the reflections when light is reflected from surfaces.

To record observations and make sense of them.

To study the difference between reflections made in dull and shiny surfaces.

To design and create a mirror maze.

To describe how shadows are formed.

To design and carry out a fair test.

To investigate making shadows using shadowgraphs.

To define terms such as ‘transparent’, ‘translucent’ and ‘opaque.’

To explore creating shadows using a variety of objects.

To research and gather some key facts about how mirrors have been made over the centuries.

To make a simple mirror and create a list of the key uses.

Opposites Attract

To observe the forces that magnets produce.

To report and present finding from enquiries.

To describe what a magnet is and its purposes.

To investigate the variety of magnetic forces and whether they can be strengthened or weakened.

To name some materials that magnets can attract and some they repel.

To list at least ten uses of magnets in everyday life.

To explore magnetic and non-magnetic metals.

To explain what a magnetic pole is and what it can do.

To predict whether two magnets will attract or repel each other.

To investigate the magnetic forces between bar magnets.

Science –

Earth Rocks!

To explore different kinds of rocks and their properties.

To collect and record data from observations and tests.

To test the properties of rocks against certain criteria (hardness, permeability, fizziness and floatability.)

To understand that minerals come from rocks.

To explore different types of rock families.

To recognise that soil comes from rock.

To set up and carry out simple, practical activities and fair tests.

To build replicas of the three rock families: igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary.

To investigate soil and its properties.

To find out how fossils are formed.

To use results to draw conclusions and suggest improvements or new questions.

 

We Are Astronauts - Child led investigation

To observe and draw the Moon from real life and secondary sources.

To make a model rocket and explain how it works.

To look at the cycle of the Moon in all its stages.

To describe what happened in the ‘Space Race’ in the 1960s.

To design and build some model rockets and a Moon lander.

To understand the difference of putting a rocket into space and the first human into space.

To study the first human landing of the Moon (20th July 1969.)

To identify which foods are best to take into space and explain why.

To know which factors affect the design of a spacesuit.

Geography

Geography –

The Nile

Develop contextual knowledge of the location of places, seas and oceans, including their defining physical human characteristics.

Where is Egypt? (Upper and Lower Egypt)

Study the location of the Nile.

Understand the uses of the Nile.

Understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time.

Farming and agriculture in Ancient Egypt.

Make a farming season wheel.

 

Geography –

Rome

Use map, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied, use the eight points of a compass, four-figure grid references, symbols and key, to build their knowledge of the UK and wider world; locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions key physical characteristics, countries, and major cities.

Locate Rome using maps, globes and digital/computer mapping.

Human geography – look at uses of land and how they have changed over time (link to Roman roads.)

Geography –

Local Study of Shenfield

Look at the local area over time and investigate the local area, orienteering/treasure hunt - UK counties and cities, understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the UK; interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and geographical information systems.

 

History

Egyptians

Who were the Ancient Egyptians?

What did the Ancient Egyptians believe? How do we know?

Who were the Egyptian gods? How do we know?

Why did the Egyptians build temples, tombs and pyramids? What were they like? How do we know? 

How different were beliefs in Ancient Egypt from today?

How did religion affect life in Ancient Egypt? 

How do we know?

What did the Egyptians believe about death and what happens to you when you die? 

How did Egyptians bury their dead and why?

How do we know? 

What was the role of the Pharaoh on earth?

What can the tomb of Tutankhamun tell us about Egyptian beliefs?

 What significance did animals have in Ancient Egypt?

 

Romans

Who were the Ancient Romans? 

Why were the Ancient Romans so powerful? 

Why did the Romans invade Britain? 

What was life like in a Roman town? 

Why did the Romans build new roads in Britain?

How did the invasion affect different people in Britain?

 What were the benefits of the Roman invasion? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shenfield St Mary’s Church of England Primary School

 

Children will be introduced to the idea that schools have been in the locality for some time but they have not always been the same.  They can look at similarities and differences as well as be introduced to some of the events that affected the schools.  The theme allows children to carry out some of their own investigations by using a range of different sources. Above all it allows the children to see some continuity between their lives and the past.

Is there any difference between schools today and in the time of their parents and grandparents?

What are some of the most important things about schools? 

Was it even more different at the time of your grandparents? 

How different were schools 100 years ago?

If a child from 100 years ago was suddenly transported into their classroom today, what would be the things that surprise them most?  Are there some things that would not surprise them?

Would you prefer to have been in school in the past or now?

What must it have been like to be at school in the past? 

What things would you have liked and what things would you have disliked about schools in the past? 

Art

Egyptians

Area – sculpture mask making

Media – recycled products, papier mache

Artist focus – Egyptian art

 Romans

Area – Painting (colour mixing only) and collage

Media – paint and clay

Artist focus – Sonia King

 

Shenfield St Mary’s CE Primary School

Area – Painting and drawing

Media – paint

Artist focus – local artists

DT

DT –

Egyptian Shadufs

Research a shaduf – an Egyptian irrigation tool

Uses and purposes

Design

Build a windmill following knex plan and then discuss how you can adapt the design to turn it into a shaduf

Create using sticks, elastic bands, string and blue tac.

DT –

Pneumatic fighters

Look at existing pneumatic products with two moving parts. Understand that pneumatics involves movement of air. Children to be independent in choosing materials and design of which two moving parts to have to create a pneumatic toy with moving gladiators/ soldiers/ animals

DT –

Flower Power Tie-Dye T-Shirts

This is to complement the art in Summer 1.

The children have already looked at Flower Power.

Research tie-dye effects on textiles.

Experiment tying different patterns using samples of fabric.

Produce a Flower Power tie-dye t-shirt.

Music

Music –

Let Your Spirit Fly

Glockenspiel 1

The children will understand and appreciate a variety of musical styles from different times and traditions. They will continue to recognise the sound of musical instruments and basic features of key musical styles. They will be encouraged to discuss music using more accurate musical language.

Music –

Three Little Birds

The Dragon Song

The children will understand and appreciate a variety of musical styles from different times and traditions. They will continue to recognise the sound of musical instruments and basic features of key musical styles. They will be encouraged to discuss music using more accurate musical language.

Music –

Bringing Us Together

Reflect, Rewind and Replay

The children will understand and appreciate a variety of musical styles from different times and traditions. They will continue to recognise the sound of musical instruments and basic features of key musical styles. They will be encouraged to discuss music using more accurate musical language.

PE

Exciting Egyptians

INDOOR

African Dance: explore African dance movements and create patterns of movement; work with a partner to create African dance patterns; perform a dance with rhythm and expression; use knowledge of African dance to create a story in small groups; develop precision of movement, to work co-operatively with a group to create a dance piece; perform in front of others with confidence. 

 

Boot Camp: understand how to prepare the body for exercise, understand what fitness means; complete a range of circuit-based activities and understand what happens to the heart rate during exercise; complete a circuit that includes practised activities with balance and co-ordination.

 

OUTDOOR

Multi-Skills: change and maintain centre of balance; develop co-ordination whilst moving an object; demonstrate agility by being able to twist and turn and change direction; practise co-ordination and moving with others; use co-ordination skills to move an object; use all ABC skills learned so far, to the best of your ability.

 

Mighty Movers (Running): explore running at different speeds; work as a team in a running situation; understand the value of a running-based circuit and the impact it can have on health; improve fitness by raising the heart rate.

Rampaging Romans

INDOOR

Gymfit Circuits: identify techniques to improve balance; practise a range of gymnastic skills through a series of circuits; perform a range of gymnastic skills with increased accuracy; perform a sequence of gymnastic moves within a circuit; perform a sequence of moves at each station within a circuit with increased accuracy; evaluate my performance of gymnastic moves within a circuit.

 

Groovy Gymnastics: explore jumping techniques and link them with other gymnastic actions; select and adapt gymnastic actions to meet the task; work with a partner or a small group to create a sequence that develops jumping skills; improve the ability to choose appropriate actions when creating a sequence of gymnastic movements to music.

 

OUTDOOR

Skip to the Beat: develop skipping techniques with control and balance; explore different ways of skipping; practise techniques learned in previous years; observe and comment on others’ performances; be aware with safety aspects concerned with skipping; participate in large rope skipping; develop large rope skipping techniques; skip with a partner; compose a sequence of skipping ropes; perform skipping moves in a routine; teach a partner a routine; perform rope and non-rope skipping with good technique and to songs or rhymes.

 

Brilliant Ball Skills (Netball): be aware of others when playing games, choose the correct skills to meet a challenge; perform a range of actions, maintaining control of the ball; master the basic catching technique, catch with increasing control and accuracy; master the basic throwing technique throw and hit a ball in different ways (e.g. high, low, fast or slow); apply skills and tactics in small-sided games, identify and follow the rules of games; choose and use simple tactics to suit different situations.

Shenfield St Mary’s Primary School

INDOOR

Cool Core (Strength): improve core strength and agility, and understand why they are important; be able to link agility and core strength activities in an appropriate way; be able to perform core strength moves with accuracy; understand how hula-hooping helps to improve core strength; develop activities into a circuit to improve core strength and fitness levels; perform a circuit with accuracy; improve scores of the skills learned over the course of a number of weeks.

 

Fitness Frenzy: complete an agility and co-ordination circuit, spending 30 seconds at each station; improve fitness by raising the heart rate in a circuit-based lesson, develop skipping techniques with control and balance; evaluate my performance of gymnastic moves within a circuit; improve core strength and agility, and understand why they are important; perform a sequence of moves at each station within a circuit with increased accuracy.

 

OUTDOOR

Throwing and Catching (Rounders): consolidate and develop a range of skills in striking and fielding; develop and investigate different ways of throwing and to know when it is appropriate to use them; practise the correct technique for catching a ball and use it in a game;  practice the correct batting technique and use it in a game situation; consolidate the throwing, catching and batting skills already learned; strike the ball for distance; know how to play a striking and fielding game competitively and fairly. 

 

Could: strike the ball accurately with power for distance; play rounders using tactics in fielding and when batting too.

 

Active Athletics: run in different directions and at different speeds, using a good technique; improve throwing technique; reinforce jumping techniques; understand the relay and passing the baton; choose and understand appropriate running techniques; compete in a mini-competition, recording scores.

 

RE

RE –

Christianity

Creation - What do Christians learn from the creation story?

Place the concepts of God and Creation on a timeline of the Bible’s ‘Big Story’.

What do Christians learn from the creation story?

Make clear links between Genesis 1 and what Christians believe about God and Creation.

What do Christians learn from the creation story?

Describe what Christians do because they believe God is Creator.

What do Christians learn from the creation story?

Ask questions and suggest answers about might be important in the creation story for Christians living today.

Ask questions and suggest answers about might be important in the creation story for people who are not Christians.

People of God - Make clear links between the story of Noah and the idea of covenant.

Understand the idea of a covenant.

Make simple links between promises in the story of Noah and promises that Christians make at a wedding ceremony.

Christmas - To be able to explain that many of the people in the Bible were expecting, waiting for and preparing for the coming of Jesus.

To explain that Christians still prepare for Christmas by thinking about whether they are ready to welcome Jesus and follow his teachings.

Buddhism

Know the story of the life of the Buddha.

The image of Buddah and the devotion shown to it.

The home shrine (placing of candles, flowers and 7 offering bowls (containing water, incense, light perfume and food)  and the home as a place of devotional practices and meditation.

 

The Three Jewels/Treasures/Refuges: the Buddha, the Dhamma, the Sangha (words uniting all Buddhists)

Festival of Asala Perahara (parading a replica of the Buddha’s tooth through the streets)

 

RE –

Christianity

Gospel - Identify this as part of a ‘Gospel’, which tells the story of the life and teaching of Jesus.

Make clear links between the calling of the first disciples and how Christians today try to follow Jesus and be ‘fishers of people.’

Offer suggestions about what Jesus’ actions towards the leper might mean for a Christian.

Make simple links between Bible texts and the concept of ‘Gospel’ (good news.)

Give examples of how Christians try to show love to all, including how members of the clergy follow Jesus’ teachings.

Make links between the Bible stories studied and the importance of love, and life in the world today, expressing some ideas of their own clearly.

Salvation - Order Creation and Fall, Incarnation, Gospel and Salvation within a timeline of the Bible ‘big story.’

Offer suggestions for what the texts about the entry into Jerusalem, and the death and resurrection of Jesus might mean.

Give examples of what the texts studied mean to some Christians.

Make simple links between the Gospel texts and how Christians mark the Easter events in their church communities.

Describe how Christians show their beliefs about Palm Sunday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday in worship.

Make links between some of the stories and teachings in the Bible and life in the world today, expressing some ideas of their own clearly.

Islam

Prayer-5 times a day- at home and in the Mosque. Prayer and rituals associated with Prayer-facing Mecca, carpet, prayer positions, Wudu (washing before prayer)

5 pillars of Islam-Shahadah, Salaah, Zakaat, Saum, Hajj –Pilgrimage to Mecca.

What happens inside a mosque (revise features too) and the role of the Imam.

The revelation of the Koran to the Prophet Muhamed.

The fasting of Ramadan and festival of Id-ul-Fitr (marking the end of Ramadan)                        

The importance of the Hajj in Islam.

RE –

Christianity

Incarnation - Identify the difference between a ‘Gospel’, which tells a story of the life and teaching of Jesus, and a letter.

Offer suggestions about what texts about baptism and Trinity might mean.

Give examples of what these texts mean to some Christians today.

Describe how Christians show their beliefs about God the Trinity in worship (in baptism and prayer, for example) and in the way they live.

Make links between some Bible texts studied and the idea of God in Christianity, expressing clearly some ideas of their own about what the God of Christianity is like.

 

Pentecost - To be able to identify the symbols commonly associated with Pentecost and say when they are used within a church.

To be able to make links between the Pentecostal symbols and the story.

To be able to describe how these express Christian belief in the Holy Spirit.

 

PSHE

PSHE - Being Me in My World

Celebrating Difference: talk about a time when my words affected someone’s feelings and what the consequences were, give and receive compliments and how this feels

PSHE – Dreams and Goals: evaluate my own learning process and identify how it can be better next time, be confident in sharing my success with others and know how to store my feelings of success in my internal treasure chest

Healthy Me: identify things, people and places that I need to keep safe from, and can tell you some strategies for keeping myself safe including who to go to for help, express how being anxious or scared feels

PSHE – Relationships: explain how some of the actions and work of people around the world help and influence my life and can show an awareness of how this could affect my choices

Changing Me: identify how boys’ and girls’ bodies change on the inside during the growing up process and can tell you why these changes are necessary so that their bodies can make babies when they grow up, recognise how I feel about these changes happening to me and know how to cope with these feelings

Computing

E-safety training

 

We are opinion pollsters

 Children will be in charge of creating their own questionnaire (based on an interest of the class). They will be using word to create their own questionnaire looking at open and closed questions.

 

Final product: Children create their own questionnaire on word.

E-safety training

 

We are presenters

Children will be shooting their own live video. They will be using simple movie editing software to edit clips by setting in/out points. They will inputting audio clips into their commentary additionally.

 

Final product: Short tv video which can then be uploaded onto class page/youtube.

E-safety training

 

We are communicators

Children will be understanding a school email system works. They will compose their own emails and respond to others, working remotely with an unknown person.

 

Final product: Communicating who stole the cake from clues sent by a child in the other class.

 

French

  • To learn numbers 0 to 10. To learn ‘oui’ and ‘non’. To learn the letter strings ‘oi’ and ‘eu’.
  • To listen and respond to rhymes, participate in a short exchange using ‘bonjour, au revoir, Comment ca va?, comme ci comme ca, ca va bien, ca va mal.’
  • To listen to and follow simple classroom instructions: salut, ecoutez, regardez, asseyez-vous, levez-vous, repetez, venez ici, silence’.
  • To perform simple communicative tasks, including ask for and give name: ‘Comment t’appelles-tu?, ‘Je m’appelle, monsieur, ‘madame’
  • To learn simple body parts in order to sing ‘Heads, shoulders, knees and toes’ in French.
  • To learn about the cultural similarities and differences of Christmas between France and the UK.
  • To join in singing a French carol.

 

  • To revise numbers 0 to 10.
  • To ask for and state age: ‘Quel age as-tu?, ‘J’ai … ans’.
  • To learn colours: ‘rouge, bleu, blanc, noir, vert, jaune, orange, rose, gris, violet, marron.
  • To introduce verb - ‘est’
  • To introduce simple connective – ‘et’.
  • To learn names of fruit: ‘les oranges, les poires, les prunes, les fraises, les pommes, les tomates, les bananes’.
  • To learn food items: ‘les chips, les sucettes, le chocolat, les bonbons’ etc.
  • To learn names of pets including: ‘un chat, un chien, une souris, un hamster, un lapin, un poisson, un cochon d’Inde, un oiseau’.
  • To chant an Easter finger rhyme in chorus with the teacher and use their hands to demonstrate meaning.
  • To learn how to write an Easter card to a standard format ie. ‘A mama et papa, Joyeuses Paques!, Grosses bises’.
  • To revise names of fruit and foods.
  • To revise colours.
  • To learn the days of the week: ‘lundi, mardi, mercredi, jeudi, vendredi, samedi, dimanche’.
  • To learn the months of the year: ‘janvier, fevrier, mars, avril, mai, juin, juillet, aout, septembre, octobre, novembre, decembre’.
  • To revisit and memorise vocabulary and phrases learnt over the year.
  • To introduce holiday language.

 

Year 4

RAIDERS AND INVADERS

 

Stunning Starter - The Raiders are coming!

 

Marvellous Middle - Trip to Sutton Hoo

 

Fabulous Finish – Year 3 & 4 Christmas Production

 

Role play – Viking/Saxon Hut– weaving

 

Visit - Sutton Hoo-Suffolk

 

Author Focus – Sally Gardner and Dick King-Smith

 

GO WITH THE FLOW!

 

Stunning Starter - Make it rain!

 

Marvellous Middle – water/river theme activities.

 

Fabulous Finish - Making bridge challenge

 

Visit – Abberton Reservoir to learn about water filtration/

Cycle

 

Role Play – Water themed/Water cycle/Weather theme

 

Author Focus – Jeremy Strong and Gillian Cross

IT’S ALL GREEK TO ME!

 

Stunning Starter – plan a holiday to Greece

 

Marvellous Middle – Mini Olympics

 

Fabulous Finish – Ancient Greek Banquet

 

Role Play – Greek home / Garden Centre

 

Visit – Dress up Greek day

 

Author Focus – Frank Cottrell and Diana Wynne Jones

English

 

English -

Non-chronological report – about the Anglo-Saxons and early settlements

Report (news) – based around finding artefacts/treasure at Sutton Hoo

Narrative – historical story based on the Anglo-Saxons

Poetry – writing and performing own poem

English -

Non-chronological report – Famous Rivers

Narrative – Spiderwick Chronicles - stories set in imaginary world – Water World theme

Poetry – single voice collections

English –

Play scripts – Greek Myths

Narrative – creating own God

Persuasive Writing – Return of the Elgin marbles

 

 

Mathematics

Mathematics –

Counting in units, tens, hundreds, twenty-fives, thousands, six, seven and nine

Place value – four digits

Finding up to 1000 more or less than a given number

Columnar addition 3-digts and 4-digitis, including problem solving

Subtraction using columnar addition

Symmetry – shapes, lines of symmetry, create symmetrical figures

Measure – mm, cm and m, perimeter of rectilinear shapes

Multiplication – 9, 10, 6, 7, 12 and 11

Mathematics –

Reasoning/problem solving

Division - pictorial /Short division 2/3-digit by 1 digit

Multiplication revision

Pictographs, bar graphs, line graphs

Factor pairs

Fractions, counting in hundredths, common equivalent fractions, add and subtract fractions with same denominator, recognise and use mixed fractions

Mathematics –

Roman numerals

Solving number and practical problems with increasingly large numbers

Recognise and use factor pairs and commutativity in calculations

Multiply 2 and 3-digit numbers by a 2-digit number using formal written method

Rounding decimals to the nearest whole number

Compare numbers with the same number of decimal places up to 2 decimal places

Science

Sound:

Identify how sounds are made, associating some of them with something vibrating.

Recognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear.

Find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the objects that produced it.

Find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it.

Recognise that sounds get fainted as the distance from the sounds source increases.

Child led investigation – Sound

 

Electricity:

Identify common appliances that run on electricity.

Construct a simple series electrical circuit, identifying and naming its basic parts, including cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers.

Identify whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is part of a complete loop with a battery.

Recognise that a switch opens and closes a circuit and associate this with whether a lamp lights in a simple series circuit.

Recognise some common conductors and insulators, and associate metals with being good conductors.

States of Matter:

Compare and group materials together, according to whether they are solids, liquids or gases.

Observe that some materials change state when they are heated or cooled, and measure or research the temperature at which this happens in degrees Celsius.

Identify the part played nu evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and associate the rate of evaporation with temperature.

 

Child led investigation – Solids and liquids

Plants:

Identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flower.

Explore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant.

Investigate the way in which water is transported within plants.

Explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.

Child led investigation - plants

 

Life things and their habitats:

Recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways.

Explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment.

Recognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things.

Geography

Geography - name and located counties and cities of the UK, geographical regions and their identifying human physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers linked to land-use/reasons for settlement in Britain), and land-use; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time (Link to reasons for invading and settling and which countries the Invaders and settlers came from); human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links(Saxon/Viking), and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

Geography - Water Cycle/Rivers. Physical geography including climate zones (around the world and UK), rivers, and the water cycle; enhance competency of geographical skills through collecting, analysing and communicating a range of data gathered through secondary resources and where possible-experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes; communicate geographical information in a variety of ways including through maps and writing at length; Arrange for Fieldwork visit. - eg. River Wid/Ingatestone Hall

Geography - link to Greece and compare to Ancient Greece describe and understand key aspects of: physical geography, develop geographical skills needed to collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of field work that deepen their understanding of geographical processes; communicate geographical information in a variety of ways including through maps and writing at length

 

 

History

Children are introduced to the idea that people from other societies have been coming to Britain for a long time. They learn about some of the tensions involved in the settlement as well as ways of life and matters that impact on us still. Links are made with other societies that contributed to the formation of the United Kingdom and how Saxons, Vikings and Scots contributed to the development of institutions, culture and ways of life in the country. There is a strong emphasis on children investigating issues and solving valid historical questions recognising the nature of the evidence on which their judgements and knowledge are based.

 

Chronology time line – putting in context of British history.

 

What happened to Britain when the Romans left?

How well did the Saxons and Vikings get on with each other?

 

The lives of significant individuals in the past who

have contributed to national and international

achievements, some of whom should be used to

compare aspects of life in different periods.

 

Isambard Kingdom Brunel

 

Who is Brunel?

 

When did Brunel live?

 

Why is this individual remembered?

 

What were the most important events in his life?

 

What were some of the features of the society when he lived?

 

What sources of information have been helpful for learning about this individual?

 

How should we remember this individual and why?

 

A study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world, gain and deploy a historically-grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’; know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations, achievements and follies of mankind, understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed.

 

How can we find out about the civilisation of Ancient Greece?

Who were the Ancient Greeks?

What do artefacts tell us about what life was like in Ancient Greece?

What do archaeological sites tell us about what life was like in Ancient Greece?

Can we learn anything from Greek myths and legends?

What do we know about the achievements of Alexander the Great?

Can we thank the Ancient Greeks for anything in our lives today?

What can we learn from our language about Ancient Greece? 

How were the Ancient Greeks governed and are there any similarities with how we are governed today?

Art

Raiders and Invaders

Area – textiles weaving

Media – fabric, thread, paper

Artist focus – Lucy Poskitt

Go with the Flow

Area – Printing and drawing

Media – printing ink, lino print

Artist focus – William Morris

Ancient Greece

Area – Sculpture

Media – clay

Artist focus –Ancient Greek sculpture and Anthony Gormley

DT

DT – Create a Raiders and Invaders electronic quiz- Understand and use electrical systems in their products, such as series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors.) – link with Science

 

DT -

to design, make and evaluate a bridge focussing on supporting structures and a mechanism. (curriculum coverage - Apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.)

Examine the structure of a variety of bridges and the materials they use, evaluate best design; investigate the structure of a bridge using a range of house hold waste boxes, design, make and evaluate a bridge with a purpose

DT –

End product to design, make and evaluate own Greek catapult – explore a range of catapults, investigate and analyse a range of catapults and materials, investigate how to join two materials together for maximum strength, research and develop a design criterion to help make a functional catapult, select and use a range of tools to create a functioning catapult, evaluate my product against the design criteria.

 

Music

Music - Mama Mia, Explore pop music through this song. Pupils to appraise and sing and accompany their singing using percussion instruments. Explore pulse, rhythm and pitch and link to their composing and performance work.

 

Christmas Production - develop performance skills with control and rhythmic accuracy

 

Music –

Lean on me - Explore Gospel/soul music through this song. Pupils to appraise and sing and accompany their singing using percussion instruments. Explore pulse, rhythm and pitch and link to their composing and performance work.

 

 

Music -

Glockenspiel 3-Develop the pupils’ understanding for the language of music through playing the Glockenspiel. Explore notation and link to the theory. Provide an opportunity to compose and improvise, appreciate music through listening and singing. Perform to each other.

Benjamin Britten, Cuckoo, appraisal and singing techniques, create compositions and perform, use musical language to describe music the perform and listen to, develop performance skills with control and rhythmic accuracy

PE

Raiders and Invaders

INDOOR

Boot Camp: understand how to prepare the body for exercise, understand what fitness means; complete a range of circuit-based activities and understand the reason for doing them; understand what happens to the heart rate during exercise; improve a circuit that includes activities practised; improve a circuit that includes activities practised with balance and co-ordination.

 

Mighty Movers (Boxercise): learn footwork movement patterns showing co-ordination; demonstrate correct technique for a jab; understand the value of boxercise moves; learn how to build an aerobic exercise routine including skilled moves; create and perform a boxercise sequence with increased accuracy; perform a boxercise routine with precision.

 

OUTDOOR

Invaders (Basketball): keep possession of a ball; use ABC (agility, balance, co-ordination) techniques to keep control of a ball in a competitive situation; use accurate passing and dribbling in a game; identify and apply ways to move the ball towards an opponent’s goal; learn concepts of attack and defence; play in a mini basketball competition.

 

Football: become familiar with kicking the ball with different parts of the foot; become comfortable with kicking the ball with both feet; progress to dribbling the ball with accuracy whilst jogging; aim and shoot at a goal; learn to attack and defend safely; be aware of the space and how it can be used effectively when passing a ball; know the positions and rules surrounding the game

 

 Go with the Flow

INDOOR

Step to the Beat: understand the importance of a warm-up to improve fitness, particularly strength and stamina; complete a step routine to music to improve fitness; develop co-ordination and balance; learn basic step moves, practise them and perfect them; practise and apply a sequence of step moves to the beat of the music; create and perform a sequence of step moves.

 

Gym Sequences: identify and practise body shapes; identify and practise symmetrical and asymmetrical body shapes; construct sequences using balancing and linking movements; use counterbalances and incorporate them into a sequence of movements; perform movements in canon and in unison; perform and evaluate own and others’ sequences. 

 

OUTDOOR

Gymfit Circuits (Sports): understand that a fitness circuit can be sport-specific; complete a hockey-based circuit with understanding and accuracy; complete a netball/basketball circuit with understanding and accuracy; complete a football-based circuit with accuracy and understanding; complete a cricket-based circuit with accuracy and understanding; complete an athletics-based circuit with control and accuracy.

 

Striking and Fielding (Cricket): develop and investigate different ways of throwing, and to know when each is appropriate; use ABC (agility, balance, co-ordination) to field a ball well; use ABC to move into good positions for catching and apply it in a game situation; use hand-eye co-ordination to strike a moving and a stationary ball; develop fielding skills and understand their importance when playing a game; play in a competitive situation, and to demonstrate sporting behaviour.

Ancient Greece

INDOOR

Cool Core (Pilates): improve balance and co-ordination; consolidate and improve the moves learned so far; develop balance techniques when performing cool core moves; sustain balance and concentration when performing a variety of cool core moves; develop cool core moves using balance techniques. 

 

Dynamic Dance: identify and practise the patterns and actions of line dancing; demonstrate an awareness of the music’s rhythm and phrasing when improvising; create an individual dance that reflects the line dancing style; create partnered dances that reflect the line dancing style and apply the key components of dance; perform a line dance using a range of movement patterns; perform and evaluate own and others’ work. .

 

OUTDOOR

Nimble Nets (Tennis): become familiar with balls and short tennis rackets; get the ball into play, accurately serve underarm; build up a rally; build a rally, focusing on accuracy of strokes; play a variety of shots in a game situation and to explore when different shots should be played; play a competitive tennis game. 

 

Young Olympians (Athletics): select and maintain a running pace for different distances; practise throwing with power and accuracy; throw safely and with understanding; demonstrate good running technique in a competitive situation; explore different footwork patterns; understand which technique is most effective when jumping for distance; utilise all the skills learned in this unit in a competitive situation.

RE

RE

Christianity

Creation – The Fall

Adam & Eve – Reflect on story

Temptation

Reflect on Christian value of Forgiveness in regards to the Fall

Moses and the plagues - Exodus

Importance of 10 commandments to Christians

Judaism

Features of the synagogue and how Jews worship there. The role of the Synagogue in the Jewish Community.

The story of the Passover, what it means to Jews, recognise and relate the symbolism of the Seder plate with the events of the Exodus (2 lessons)

Observing Shabbat in the home and the Synagogue.

The Importance of the home in Jewish Life: keeping a Kosher home and observing dietary laws.

RE

Christianity

People of God

Noah and Abraham – relationships/ covenants with God

Incarnation: What is the Trinity?

Sikhism

Festival of Baisakhi (the story of how Guru Gobind Singh founded the Khalsa – the Sikh community-took place on Baisakhi Day.

The Five K’s and the turban.

The importance of equality in Sikhism. How they live their lives-ie following the example of the Gurus, focussing their lives on God rather than themselves. Living a life of service to Godand service to others.

Sharing the langar (communal meal) vand chhakna: giving money or time to help others

 

 

RE –

Christianity

Kingdom of God - consider the impact of the story of the Pentecost on those involved and to Christians today, make links between the story of the Pentecost and the Holy Spirit, compare how the disciples felt before and after the Pentecost

 

PSHE

PSHE – Being Me in My World

Celebrating Difference: tell you a time when my first impression of someone changed as I got to know them, explain why it is good to accept people for who they are

 

PSHE – Dreams and Goals: know how to make a new plan and set new goals even if I have been disappointed, know what it means to be resilient and to have a positive attitude

Health Me: recognise when people are putting me under pressure and can explain ways to resist this when I want to , identify feelings of anxiety and fear associated with peer pressure

 

PSHE – Relationships: explain different points of view on an animal rights issue and express my own opinion and feelings on this

Changing Me: identify what I am looking forward to when I am in Year 5, reflect on the changes I would like to make when I am in year 5 and can describe how to go about this

 

Democracy – linked to Ancient Greeks: understand my rights and responsibilities, have an opinion and listen to others, what is a democracy, creating a new class/school rule democratically

Computing

Computing

e-safety

We are software developers

 

Children will be making their own maths times table game. They will focus on adding 2 sprites (1 that moves at a steady rate and 1 that moves as you answer the questions correctly/incorrectly). They will be working on adding variables.

 

Final product: Chn will create their own times table game on scratch which alters based on an input (variable) from the user.

The children will then be creating their own toy in scratch which has moving parts. It incorporates sound within scratch and they have to present it in a Dragon’s den format.

Computing

e-safety

We are meteorologists

 

Children use weather collecting resources to input the data into an excel spreadsheet and record using graphs.

 

Final product: Chn create their own excel spreadsheet to record the information about the weather in Shenfield.

 

Computing

e-safety

We are co-authors

 

The children work in small groups to create a presentation about their topic. They all have a different part of the presentation and use google shared documents to create the presentation together.

 

Final product: Create a group presentation

 

 

French

  • To revise knowledge of French culture and landmarks.
  • To revise colours from Year 3.
  • To learn further parts of the body: ‘une tete, un nez, des dents, des cheveux, des yeux, une bouche, des oreilles, la jambe, le pied, le ventre, ‘la main, le bras’.
  • To develop conversation; ask for French translation: ‘Comment dit-on … en francais?’
  • To revise pet vocabulary and develop conversation skills using the following phrases: ‘J’ai, je n’ai pas de, et, aussi’).
  • To learn zoo animals: ‘le tigre, l’elephant, l’ours, la souris, le lion, la girafe, le singe, le crocodile, le pingouin’.
  • To learn some letters of the alphabet and introduce vowels.
  • To learn the verb ‘etre’ (to be).
  • To learn qualifiers: ‘assez’, ‘tres’.
  • To revise and learn adjectives: ‘grand’, ‘petit’, ‘gentil’, ‘rigolo’, ‘feroce’.
  • To play a game in groups using French as the means of communication (Beetle/Dice Game: The object of the game is to be the first person to build a snowman, whilst reinforcing the following French words: ‘le chapeau, la tete, le corps, le bras, la jambe, l’echarpe’.
  • To revisit and memorise vocabulary and phrases learnt over the term.

 

  • To learn a French nursery rhyme entitled ‘Meunier, tu dors’ and listen for sounds, rhyme and rhythm.
  • To learn members of the family: ‘papa, maman, le pere, la mere, le frere, la soeur, le grand-pere, la grand-mere’.
  • To learn the possessive adjectives: ‘mon, ma’.
  • To ask and answer questions about family members.
  • To recognise similarities and differences between traditional stories in French and English and learn the vocabulary for ‘La petite fille’.
  • To know about some French traditions relating to Easter.
  • To draw and describe their own Easter egg using the following model: ‘Mon oeuf est assez petit, rouge et vert.’
  • To revisit and memorise vocabulary and phrases learnt over the term.

 

  • To learn vocabulary related to hobbies including: ‘danser, nager, jouer au football, jouer au tennis, manger au restaurant, lire, regarder la television, aller au parc’.
  • To express likes and dislikes in oral and written form using the following phrases: ‘J’adore, j’aime, je n’aime pas’.
  • To learn numbers 11 to 30.
  • To know the names and locations of some major ports and airports in France.
  • To learn about ways of travelling to the country/countries including the following new vocabulary: ‘en bateau, en voiture, en car, en train, en avion’
  • To learn vocabulary related to holiday packing including: ‘il fait chaud, il fait froid, tres, un peu, un pantalon, un short, une jupe, un pull, un tee shirt, un chapeau, une chemise, un maillot de bain, des lunettes de soleil’.
  • To revisit and memorise vocabulary and phrases learnt over the year.

 

Year 5

FINDING FLATFORD

 

Stunning Starter - PowerPoint to introduce The Alps

 

Marvellous Middle - Forensic scientist

 

Fabulous Finish - make own water wheel.

 

Visit – Flatford Mill residential

 

Author Focus – Michael Morpurgo and Anne Fine

STIG OF THE DUMP

 

Stunning Starter – Journey back in Time to the Stone Age (toilet roll)

 

Marvellous Middle – Stone Age Trip

 

Fabulous Finish – Create a prehistoric house/Stonehenge- using natural materials.

 

Visit – Celtic Harmony-Stone Age Day

 

Author Focus – David Walliams and Anthony Horowitz

I LOVE LONDON

 

Stunning Starter – London landmarks and British Monarch

 

Marvellous Middle - London Visit

 

Fabulous Finish - Create London using junk material

 

Visit – London –Residential (inc. visit to Greenwich/Tower Bridge/river trip)

 

Author Focus – Jamilia Gavin and Elizabeth Laird

English

English -

Narrative -  Midnight Fox

Instructions - Link to Science topics (Forensic Science)

Poetry - Michael Rosen and Charles Causley)

Recount – night walk at Flatford

English –

Persuasive writing –

(The big write is based on the Jigsaw PHSE unit ‘Healthy Me’)

Topic choices:

Smoking

Alcohol

Body Image

Relationship with food

Choosing a healthy lifestyle

 

Myths, Fables and Traditional Tales -

Recount – Celtic Harmony visit

English -

Narrative - Oranges in No Man’s Land

Poetry -  The Highway Man

Recount – Visit to London

Non-chronological report-linked to a visit leaflet/guide

Maths

Mathematics -

 

Number: Place Value – numbers to 10,000, roman numerals to 1,00, round to nearest 10, 100 and 1,00, number to 100,000, compare and order numbers to 100,000, round numbers within 100,00, number to a million, counting in 10s, 100s, 1,000s, 10,000s, and 100,000s, compare and order number to one million, round numbers to one million, negative numbers.

Number: Addition and Subtraction – add whole numbers with more than 4 digits (column method), subtract whole numbers with more than 4 digits (column method), round to estimate and approximate, inverse operation (addition and subtraction), multi-step addition and subtraction problems. 

Statistics – read and interpret line graphs, draw line graphs, use line graphs to solve problems, read and interpret tables, two-way tables, timetables.

Number: Multiplication and Division – multiples, factors, common factors, prime numbers, square numbers, cube numbers, multiply by 10, 100 and 1,00, divide by 10, 100 and 1,00, multiples of 10, 100 and 1,000.

Perimeter and Area – measure perimeter, calculate perimeter, area of rectangles, area of compound shapes, area of irregular shapes.

Mathematics -

 

Number: Multiplication and Division – multiply 4-digits by 1-digit, multiply 2-digits (area model), multiply 2-digits by 2-digits, multiply 3-digits by 2 digits, multiply 4-digits by 2-digits, divide 4-digits by 2-digits, divide with remainders.

Number: Fractions – equivalent fractions, improper fractions to mixed numbers, mixed numbers to improper fractions, number sequences, compare and order fractions less than 1, compare and order fractions greater than 1, add and subtract fractions add fractions within 1, add 2 or more fractions, add fractions, add mixed numbers, subtract fractions subtract mixed numbers subtract – breaking whole. 

Number: Decimals and percentages – decimals up to 2dpm decimals as fractions, understand thousandths, thousands as decimals, rounding decimals, order and compare decimals, understand percentages, percentages as fractions and decimals, equivalent fractions, decimals and percentages.

Mathematics -

 

Number: Decimals – adding decimals within 1, subtracting decimals within 1, complements to 1, adding decimals – crossing the whole, adding decimals with the same number of decimal places, subtracting decimals with the same number of decimal places, adding decimals with a different number of decimal places, subtracting decimals with a different number of decimals places, adding and subtracting wholes and decimals, decimal sequences, multiplying decimals by 10, 100 and 1,00, dividing decimals by 10, 100 and 1,00.

Geometry: Properties of Shapes – measuring angles in degrees, measuring with a protractor, drawing lines and angles accurately, calculating angles on a straight line, calculating angles around a point, calculating lengths and angles in shapes, regular and irregular polygons, reasoning about 3D shapes. 

Geometry: Position and Direction – position in the first quadrant, reflection, reflection with coordinates, translation, translation with coordinates. 

Measurement: Converting Units – kilograms and kilometres, milligrams and millilitres, metric units, imperial units, converting units of time, timetables

Measures: Volume – What is volume? Compare volume, estimate volume, estimate capacity.

Science

Science –

Super Scientists

Forensic Scientist –visitor-workshop

(inventions/discoveries, Da Vinci, Wallace and Grommit)

 

Forces:

Explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object.

Identify the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction, that act between moving surfaces.

Recognise that some mechanisms including levers, pulleys and gears allow a smaller force to have a greater effect.

 

CHILD LEAD INVESTIGATION – Generating their own questions to plan and carry out an investigation exploring friction.

Science –

link with Stone Age materials available and limitations as a result.

Materials:

Compare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal) and response to magnets.

Know that some materials will dissolve in liquid to form a solution, and describe how to recover a substance from a solution.

Use knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving and evaporating.

Give reasons, based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, for the particular uses of everyday materials, including metals, wood and plastic. Demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes.

Explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda.

CHILD LEAD INVESTIGATION  - regarding materials

Science -

Electricity - Associate the brightness of a lamp or the volume of a buzzer with the number and voltage of cells used in a circuit.

Compare and give reasons for variations in how components function, including the brightness of bulbs, the loudness of buzzers and the on/off position of switches.

Use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit in a diagram.

 

Earth and Space:

Describe the movement of the Earth and other plants relative to the Sun in the Solar system.

Describe the movement of the moon relative to the Earth.

Describe the sun, Earth and moon as approximately spherical bodies.

Use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky.

CHILD LEAD INVESTIGATION

Geography

Geography –

Flatford Mill

Mapping skills-how to read maps, scaling, how to create maps of different areas and making a suitable key.

Comparing locations –where we live and East Bergholt- include the services provided etc. Place knowledge & understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography –impact of tourism. Understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time.

Include using photos to identify different locations on a map. Orienteering-at Flatford to practise mapping skills.

Geography –

Stone Age-using the land for their food and shelter-explore how this changes over the period of history being studied this term.

Iron Age hill forts –how and where they have been discovered by archaeologists explored through Stig of the Dump-Prehistoric Britain.

 

Geography-

Buildings/South Bank. Use the 8 points of a compass, 4 and 6 figure grid references, symbols and key (ordnance survey) to build knowledge of the UK and wider world.

Name and locate counties and cities of the UK, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics. The Prime/Greenwich Meridian and times zones (including day and night);

geographical skills and fieldwork.

Place knowledge & understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography –impact of tourism.

 

History

Flatford (Geography focus)

 

The lives of significant individuals in the past who

have contributed to national and international

achievements, some of whom should be used to

compare aspects of life in different periods.

 

Who is John Constable?

 

When did John Constable live?

 

Why is this individual remembered?

 

What were the most important events in his life?

 

What were some of the features of the society when he/she lived?

 

What sources of information have been helpful for learning about this individual?

 

How should we remember this individual and why?

 

Stone Age to Iron Age

Children can be introduced to the idea that people have been living in Britain for a very long time. They can learn about the changes that occurred between the middle Stone Age [Mesolithic Times] to the Iron Age – a period of over 10,000 years! Pupils should be encouraged to recognise the continuities too. For example, there is very little change in houses, house-building or settlement size, until well into the Iron Age. For most of the period there is no written evidence, so the archaeological record is very important.

 

There is a strong emphasis on children investigating issues and solving valid historical questions recognising the nature of the evidence on which their judgements and knowledge are based.

 

What was ‘new’ about the New Stone Age? 

Which was better, bronze or iron? 

If you were Julius Caesar, would you have invaded Britain in 55BC? 

When do you think it was better to live – Stone Age, Bronze Age or Iron Age?

I love London

 

The lives of significant individuals in the past who

have contributed to national and international

achievements, some of whom should be used to

compare aspects of life in different periods.

 

Links to Year 1, 2 – Great fire and Paddington topic.

 

Who is  Queen Victoria?

 

When did Queen Victoria live?

 

Why is this individual remembered?

 

What were the most important events in his/her life?

 

What were some of the features of the society when he/she lived?

 

What sources of information have been helpful for learning about this individual?

 

How should we remember this individual and why?

 

Local History: A study over time reflected in London: Transport

 

Children can be introduced to the idea that transport has changed considerably in London over time and that this has had a significant impact on the way that the community has changed and developed. They can also understand how and why these developments have occurred.

 

How did early transport hold back developments in London?

How many different kinds of transport would there have been in the area long ago?

Has transport always been the same in the past? 

What challenges might people in the past have had when using transport?

Why were improvements made to transport in London?

Why do things change? 

Can the children:

Why did changes occur in the order they did?

How might local people have reacted to CASE STUDY?

How much difference did these improvements in transport make to London?

Who would make most use of this transport development? [

What evidence exists today and how useful is it? 

How and why has transport changed in recent times?

Art

Finding Flatford

Area – Painting and drawing (including perspective)

Media – paint (poster paint, water colour paint and mixed media)

Artist focus –John Constable

Stig of the Dump

Area – Painting (different effects eg stippling)

Media – paint and mixed media

Artist focus – cave paintings

I love London

 

Area – Textiles sewing

Media – paint , fabric, thread, sewing other items

Artist focus –Rachel Howard

DT

DT –

understand and use mechanical systems in their products, such as gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages –Use this to make their own water wheels.

DT –

structures, create a weatherproof structure using natural materials-e.g. Stone circle/prehistoric home.  Focus on testing the product and evaluating it using a wind and water test. Discuss testing of products, specifically look at different tests a car has to go through in order to be deemed roadworthy

DT -

Children look at different fabric prints of London and compare. Also look at arrange of fabrics discussing/ comparing textures. Children plan a fabric with structures of London. Landmarks: London Eye, Tower of London, Monument etc and choose a range of fabrics carefully explaining choices. Sewing- linked to art topic.

Children build on from the unit in Year three to create a car that moves using electronics both forwards and backwards. Children to make a vehicle related to London- with a taxi or a bus, or create a new London vehicle. Links with Ford, with engineers coming in to assist. Children will work in partners to create a car using electric motors. The car will be built on a wooden frame.

 

Music

Music-

Living on a prayer - How Rock music developed from the Beatles onwards. Analysing performance. Pulse (duration) - steady beat rhythm (duration) - long and short sounds over a steady beat pitch -high and low sounds

Tempo - fast and slow Dynamics- loud and quiet timbre - the character of a sound

Texture - layers of sound, how thick or thin music is Structure- how the behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about Iand contact.

Music for Christmas

 

Music-

Classroom Jazz 2

Children will learn to play parts of the tune leading up to playing the whole tune and improvising using instruments. Children will have the opportunity to compose their own tunes and perform them to an audience.

 

Old School Hip Hop

Children will learn to sing and play instruments to the Fresh Prince of Belair. They will have the opportunity to provide vocal and instrumental improvisation. Children will perform their compositions and then will compare two performances and provide critical feedback.

 

Children will learn songs and sing in large and small groups in preparation for the Easter service

Music -

Make you feel loved Pop Ballads Historical context for ballads

Pulse (duration) - steady beat rhythm (duration) - long and short sounds over a steady beat PITCH - high and low sounds Tempo - fast and slow

Dynamics - loud and quiet Timbre - the character of a sound Texture - layers of sound, how thick or thin music is Structure - how the section of a song or piece of music are ordered.

Children will learn the songs for the Summer Production.

PE

Finding Flatford

INDOOR

Boot Camp: understand how to prepare the body for exercise; understand what fitness means; complete a range of circuit-based activities and understand the reason for doing them; understand what happens to the heart rate during exercise; complete a circuit that includes activities practised; complete a circuit that includes activities practised with balance and co-ordination.

 

Mighty Movers (Boxercise): perform a boxercise routine demonstrating good technique; understand the principles of dynamic stretching; improve fitness by raising the heart rate and strengthening the legs and arms; create and apply compositional ideas to the sequence; perform actions and moves fluently to music in order to improve personal fitness; learn how boxercise moves can be adapted and used in a different format. 

 

OUTDOOR

Invaders (Netball): demonstrate basic passing and receiving skills using a netball; develop an understanding and knowledge of the basic footwork rules of netball; use good hand/eye co-ordination to pass and receive a ball successfully; develop skills in the range of passes – chest pass, overhead pass, bounce pass and to understand which pass to use depending on the distance the ball needs to travel; understand the importance of ‘getting free’ in order to receive a pass; understand how to make space by moving away and coming back and by dodging; be able to demonstrate a range of defending skills and understand how to mark an opponent; understand how to intercept a pass; learn how to shoot; understand the different positions in a netball team (five-a-side); recognise which positions are attacking and which are defending.

 

Hockey:  to demonstrate how to hold a hockey stick correctly; to use a hockey stick safely; move the ball within a space and pass to other players; pass the ball to other players in order to score against another team; learn to defend a goal and intercept passes from other players; maintain possession of the ball in a game situation; lead others in developing their skills and learn from others about strategies that could be useful in a game.

Stig of the Dump

INDOOR

Step to the Beat: understand the importance of a warm-up; develop co-ordination and balance; develop timing; improve general fitness levels; understand the benefits of improving muscle tone in the abdominals and legs; learn new strength-based moves; develop understanding of the value of this type of exercise; construct own moves from knowledge gained in the previous lessons; perform a sequence of steps in time with the music; understand the benefits of improving muscle tone and aerobic fitness (strength and stamina).

 

Gym Sequences: identify and practise body shapes and balances; identify and practise symmetrical and asymmetrical body shapes; use and refine the following skills: flexibility, strength, balance, power and mental focus; develop skills for movement; use counterbalances and incorporate them into a sequence of movements; perform movements in canon and unison; perform and evaluate own and others’ sequences.

 

OUTDOOR

Gymfit Circuits (Obstacle): understand why fitness is good for health and wellbeing; perform a fitness circuit that aims to improve strength and stamina; understand the relevance of each activity; explore reasons for improvement or lack of improvement; use the correct technique for new stations that include equipment; develop consistency in technique; develop personal fitness in an obstacle-style circuit; understand that circuits take different forms and work on different fitness elements; improve performance.

 

Nimble Nets (Tennis): identify and apply techniques for hitting a tennis ball; develop the techniques for ground strokes and volleys; develop a backhand technique and use it in a game; practise techniques for all strokes; use the scoring system and court for singles tennis; play a tennis game using an overhead serve and the correct selection of shots; understand and use doubles scoring in a tennis game.

 

I Love London

INDOOR

Cool Core (Pilates): identify techniques to improve balance and core strength; improve co-ordination; perform Pilates/Yoga poses with accuracy; learn how to link moves together to make a sequence; learn new poses each week to build a basic understanding of moves; help a partner to achieve good technique by observing and coaching; learn when and how to improve; devise own unique poses and name them; devise a sequence of Yoga/Pilates moves.

 

Fitness Frenzy: complete a circuit that includes a range of activities; learn how boxercise moves can be adapted and used in a different format; perform a sequence of steps in time with the music; understand the benefits of improving muscles tone and aerobic fitness (strength and stamina); understand why fitness is good for health and wellbeing; identify techniques to improve balance and core strength, improve co-ordination; perform a sequence of moves at each station within a circuit with increased accuracy. 

 

OUTDOOR

Young Olympians (Athletics): use correct techniques to run at speed; develop the ability to run for distance; throw with accuracy and power; identify and apply techniques of relay running; explore different footwork patterns; understand which technique is most effective when jumping for distance; learn how to use skills to improve the distance of a pull throw; demonstrate good techniques in a competitive situation.

 

Striking and Fielding (Cricket): develop skills in batting and fielding; choose fielding techniques, run between the wickets; run, throw and catch; develop a safe and effective overarm throw; learn batting control; use all the skills learned by playing in a mini tournament.

RE

RE

Christianity

Creation/Fall – importance of Creation, what type of text Christians say Genesis is and its purpose, what might it mean, how Christians may interpret it in different ways, link between Genesis 1 and God as Creator, develop understanding of why Christians find science and faith go together, identify key areas from study of Genesis 1 and comment on how fare these are helpful or inspiring, justifying their responses, weigh up how far Genesis 1 creation narrative is in conflict, or is complementary, with a scientific account.

God – identify different types of biblical texts, using technical terms accurately, explain connection between biblical texts and Christian ideas of God using theological terms (David, Isaiah, John). 

Making clear connections between Bible texts and what Christians believe about God; for example, how churches are designed.  Show how Christians put their beliefs into practice in worship.

Weigh up how biblical ideas and teachings about God as holy and loving might make a difference in the world today, developing insights of their own.  Who how Christians put their belief about Jesus’ incarnation into practice in different ways in celebrating Christmas.  Jesus is the Messiah makes sense in the wider story of the Bible.  Weigh up how far the idea that Jesus is the Messiah (a Saviour from God) is important in the world today and what different that might make in Christian’s lives.

RE –

Christianity

Gospel – Identify features of Gospel texts, compare ideas with ways in which Christians interpret biblical texts, showing awareness of different interpretations.  Relate biblical ideas, teachings of beliefs to the issues, problems and opportunities of their own lives and the lives of their own community in the world today, offering insights of their own.

Salvation - Outline the timeline of the ‘big story’ of the Bible, explaining how Incarnation and Salvation fit within it. Explain what Christians mean when they say that Jesus’ death was a sacrifice, using theological terms. Suggest meanings for narratives of Jesus’ death/resurrection, comparing their ideas with ways in which Christians interpret these texts. Make clear connections between the Christian belief in Jesus’ death as a sacrifice and how Christians celebrate Holy Communion/Lord’s Supper. Show how Christians put their faith belief into practice. Weigh up the value and impact of ideas of sacrifice in their own lives and the world today.

Buddhism

To understand how Buddhists live their lives using the Noble Eightfold path.

To understand what enlightment means to a Buddhist. How this is celebrated through the festival of Wesek. Reverence shown to Bodhi tree and how this links to Buddha’s enlightenment.

The lotus symbol

To be able to understand why Vaisakha is an important festival for Buddhists.

Buddhists try to follow the example of Buddah and live by his teachings and follow the Middle Way and try to reduce suffering.

The Theravada and how monks are looked after by their community. The role of the monks in their community.

 

RE –

Christianity

Pentecost – Look at how there can be two winds-one which can be destructive and the other gentle and how this affects the way they behave and linked to the coming of the Holy Spirit.

Kingdom of God - Explain connections between biblical texts and the concept of the Kingdom of God.  Consider different possible meanings for the biblical texts studied, showing awareness of different interpretations.  Make clear connection between belief in the Kingdom of God and how Christians put their beliefs into practice in different ways, including in worship and in service to the community.  Relate Christian teachings or beliefs about God’s kingdom to the issues, problems and opportunities of their own lives and the life of their own community in the world today, offering insights about whether about the world could or should learn from Christian ideas.

Hinduism

To explore the concept of Brahman and the Trimurti: Brahma (creator), Vishnu (Preserver) and Shiva (destroyer)

Explore how Hindus worship at home-shrines and puja. 

Find out how worship at home translates to worship in the community at the Mandir Temple-inc. prayers and mantras.  Visit local Mandir Temple and talk to local Hindus about their faith. 

Look at Hindu story of Ganesha and its significance to Hindus.

To learn about important stages in a Hindu’s life: Birth, Naming Ceremonies, Weddings, Reincarnation

PSHE

PSHE – Being Me in My World

Celebrating Difference: explain the differences between direct and indirect types of bullying, know some ways to encourage children who use bullying behaviours to make other choices and know how to support children who are being bullied

PSHE – Dreams and Goals: describe the dreams and goals of a young person in a culture different from mine and can reflect on how these related to my own

Healthy Me: describe the different roles food can play in people’s lives and can explain how people can develop eating problems (disorders) relating to body image pressures, respect and value my body

PSHE – Relationships: explain how to stay safe when using technology to communicated with my friends, recognise and resist pressures to use technology in ways that may be risky or cause harm to myself or others

Changing Me: describe how boys’ and girls’ bodies change during puberty, express how I feel about the changes that will happen to me during puberty

Computing

Computing -

E-Safety

Children will be creating their own websites, using wicks. They created their own area for their website about Flatford and they have to upload pictures, include text (different fonts) and different backgrounds.

 

Final product: Create their own website using wicks

 

Computing -

E-Safety

We Are Game Developers

Children will be creating their own game using scratch based on the topic of the stone age. They will play a range of different games to then create their own.

 

Final product: Create their own game using scratch, inputting music into their game.

 

Computing -

E-Safety

We are architects

Children will be creating their own virtual room in a house. They will be using 3D technology (paint 3D and TinkerCad) to create items within their room.

 

Final product: Create their own room within a house and present it for an advert about their house.

 

French

  • To make simple sentences and manipulate them by changing an element – ‘Il y a …’
  • To introduce buildings on the high street: ‘un marche, un magasin, un supermarche, une poste, une banque, un café, une mairie, un magazine de vetements, une boulangerie’.
  • To learn directions: ‘a gauche, a droite’.
  • To revise connectives: ‘et’ and ‘aussi’; to revise adjectives: ‘grand’ and ‘petit’.
  • To ask where places are: ‘Ou est..?’ and learn the following terms: ‘ici, c’est, au coin’.
  • To revise days of the week and introduce times of the day: ‘le matin’, ‘l’apres-midi’, ‘le soir’, ‘a 10 heures’, a 4 heures et demie’.
  • To learn weather vocabulary: ‘Il fait froid, Il fait chaud, Il fait beau, Il fait mauvais, Il y a du soleil, Il y a du vent, Il y a du brouillard, Il pleut, Il neige’.
  • To compare the Christmas tree tradition in England and France.
  • To revise days of the week.
  • To revise hobbies and sports vocabulary from Year 4.
  • To revise months of the year.
  • To revise numbers from 0 to 30 and learn numbers from 31 to 50
  • To learn mathematical vocabulary: ‘plus que’.
  • To revise fruit and food words from Year 3 and extend vocabulary to include: ‘le pain, la baguette, ‘e riz, les pates, les pommes de terre, le jambon, le poisson, le fromage, l’eau, le yaourt, la glace, le gateau, les biscuits, les frites, la salade, ‘es carottes, les petis pois’.
  • Revise connectives: ‘et, mais, aussi’ and express food likes and dislikes using the terms: ‘J’aime, Je n’aime pas’.
  • To learn breakfast vocabulary: ‘un croissant, un pain au chocolat, un pain aux raisins, une tartine, un chocolate chaud, un jus d’orange.’
  • To be able to respond to the question ‘Qu’est-ce que tu veux?’ with the response ‘Je voudrais’.
  • To revise telling the time.
  • To begin to order text correctly in French using recipe sentence cards; to learn the following dessert vocabulary: ‘le beurre, le sucre, des oeufs, le sel’.
  • To revise days of the week and months of the year.
  • To know how to say today’s date in French following the model: ‘aujourd ’hui c’est le lundi 10 octobre’.
  • To revise weather vocabulary and to learn seasons vocabulary: ‘en automne, en hiver, au printemps, ‘en ete’, extending to ‘normalement’ and ‘en general’.
  • To develop sentence construction orally using vocabulary about where you live including: ‘J’habite a …., dans la nord, dans le sud, dans l’ouest, dans l’est, de l’Angleterre’.
  • To learn a traditional French song entitled ‘Vive le vent’ to the tune of Jingle Bells.
  • To revise and memorise vocabulary and phrases learnt over the year.

Year 6

The Explorer

 

Stunning Starter – Mayan workshop to visit school, Mexicolore

 

Marvellous Middle:masks and rainmakers

 

Fabulous Finish: Christmas Service

 

Visit – Mexicolore workshop

 

Goodnight Mr Tom

 

Stunning Starter: Watch film Carrie’s War

 

Marvellous Middle: wartime visitors from local community

 

Fabulous Finish: visit to Duxford as evacuees with gas masks and wartime lunches.

 

Visit: Duxford

On Dangerous Ground

 

 

Stunning Starter: Ice Age 4

 

Marvellous Middle: Make volcano

 

Fabulous finish: Leaver’s Assembly

 

Visit: PGL

 

English

English

Spelling and Grammar alongside day to day teaching. Term 1

Book focus – The Explorer

Descriptions of settings

Figurative features- simile, metaphor, personification

Information texts- Information page on a sloth

Biographies- Katherine Rundell and explorer Frederick Catherwood

Book Focus- Eye of the Wolf

Writing stories using flashbacks combining past and present tense

AUTHOR FOCUS- Katherine Rundell

English

Spelling and Grammar alongside day to day teaching. Term 2

Book focus- Goodnight Mr Tom

Poetry- Dreadful Menace, rhyming couplets

Letter writing- formal, informal

Diary writing- Two views of the same event

Newspaper reports

Information leaflet- Duxford

Narrative - The Piano

 

AUTHOR FOCUS- Michelle Magorian

English

Spelling and Grammar alongside day to day teaching. Term 3

Information texts- Miptors

Descriptive writing- Little Vixen Street

Writing using suspense and mystery

Instruction writing

Factual writing- Dangers of a volcano

Letter writing – Pompeii

Playscripts- Macbeth and Midsummer Night’s Dream

 

AUTHOR FOCUS- Shakespeare

Maths

Mathematics -

Place Value - Read, write, order, and compare numbers up to 10,000,000 and determine the value of each digit.

Round any whole number to a required degree of accuracy.  Use negative numbers in context, and calculate intervals across zero. Solve number and practical problems that involve all of the above.

 

Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division - Solve addition and subtraction multi step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why. Multiply multi-digit number up to 4 digits by a 2-digit number using the formal written method of long multiplication. Divide numbers up to 4 digit by a 2-digit whole number using the formal written method of long division, and interpret remainders as whole number remainders, fractions, or by rounding as appropriate for the context. Divide numbers up to 4 digits by a 2-digit number using the formal written method of short division, interpreting remainders according to the context. Perform mental calculations, including with mixed operations and large numbers. Identify common factors, common multiples and prime numbers. Use their knowledge of the order of operations to carry out calculations involving the four operations. Solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. Use estimation to check answers to calculations and determine in the context of a problem, an appropriate degree of accuracy.

 

Fractions - Use common factors to simplify fractions; use common multiples to express fractions in the same denomination. Compare and order fractions including >1. Generate and describe linear number sequences (with fractions). Add and subtract fractions with different denominations and mixed numbers, using the concept of equivalent fractions. Multiply simple pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form. Divide proper fractions by whole numbers. Associate a fraction with division and calculate decimal fraction equivalents for a simple fraction. Recall and use equivalences between simple fractions, decimals and percentages, including in different contexts.

 

Geometry: Position and Direction - Describe positions on the full coordinate (all four quadrants).  Draw and translate simple shapes on the coordinate plane, and reflect them in the axes.

Mathematics -

Decimals - Identify the value of each digit in numbers given to 3 decimal places and multiply numbers by 10, 100 and 1000 giving answers up to 3 decimal places.  Multiply one-digit numbers with up to 2 decimal places by whole numbers.  Use written division methods in cases where the answer has up to 2 decimal places.  Solve problems which require answers to be rounded to specified degrees of accuracy.

 

Percentages - Solve problems involving the calculation of percentages (for example, of measures and such as 15% of 360) and the use of percentages for comparison.  Recall and use equivalences between simple fractions, decimals and percentages including in different contexts.

 

Algebra - Use simple formulae.  Generate and describe linear number sequences.  Express missing number problems algebraically.  Find pairs of numbers that satisfy an equation with two unknowns.  Enumerate possibilities of combinations of two variables.

 

Converting units- Solve problems involving the calculation and conversion of units of measure, using decimal notation up to three decimal places where appropriate.  Use, read, write and convert between standard units, converting measurements of length, mass, volume and time from a smaller unit of measure to a larger unit, and vice versa, using decimal notation to up to 3 decimal places.  Convert between miles and kilometres.

 

Perimeter, area and volume- Recognise that shapes with the same areas can have different perimeters and vice versa. Recognise when it is possible to use formulae for area and volume of shapes. Calculate the area of parallelograms and triangles.Calculate, estimate and compare volume of cubes and cuboids using standard units and extending to other units.

 

Ratio - Solve problems involving the relative sizes of two quantities where missing values can be found by using integer multiplication and division facts. Solve problems involving similar shapes where the scale factor is known or can be found.

Mathematics -

Properties of shapes - Draw 2D shapes using given dimensions and angles.  Compare and classify geometric shapes based on their properties and sizes and find unknown angles in any triangles, quadrilaterals and regular polygons.  Recognise angles where they meet at a point, are on a straight line, or are vertically opposite, and find missing angles.

 

Problem Solving - Apply knowledge of a variety of mathematical concepts to problem-solving and reasoning tasks.

 

Statistics - Illustrate and name parts of circles, including radius, diameter and circumference and know that the diameter is twice the radius.  Interpret and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problems.  Calculate the mean as an average.

 

Famous mathematicians: Look at the work of a number of mathematicians including: Napier, Fibonacci and Brahmagupta.

 

Science

Science -

Evolution and inheritance - recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago.

Recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents,

Identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.

 

Light - Recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines.

Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eye.

Explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or light sources to objects and then to our eyes.

Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them.

CHILD-LED INVESTIGATION-How could you prove that light travels in straight lines?

Science –

Staying Alive – The circulatory system

Identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system, and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood.

Recognised the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function.  Describe the ways in which nutrients and water are transported within animals, including humans.

Classifying Critters-

Children will learn that the animal kingdom can be subdivided into vertebrates and invertebrates and what this means. They look at the five kingdoms of living things plus fungi and microbes. Children find about Carl Linnaeus and plant classification.

CHILD-LED INVESTIGATION- Devise an investigation which uses what you have learned about how lungs work.

Science –

Circle of life

Children look at life cycles of various species including mammals, amphibians and birds. Children will also look at and describe the changes as humans develop to old age. They will draw a timeline to indicate stages in the growth and development of humans and learn about the changes experienced in puberty.

Growing Up and Growing Old

Children will look at changes as humans develop to old age, including puberty and adolescence. They will compare and analysis the gestation periods of different animals. They will collect and compare data on average heights as we grow up. Children will describe the changes that happen to us as we enter old age and consider the impact of living

CHILD-LED INVESTIGATION- What can you investigate involving growth?

 

 

Geography

Geography: a region between North and South America, climate zones - human geography , including: types of settlement and land use, the distribution of natural resources, food, identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator.

Children discuss what they already know about the Mayans and what they would like to find out. They use a range of maps and atlases to find out where the Mayans lived. They also locate cities in Mesoamerica and compare their structure to modern cities. Children also compare the climate of Britain and Mesoamerica.

 

Geography: economic activity including trade links, mineral including energy.

Children will identify the countries involved in WW2 through a variety of map work activities. They will research where children were evacuated to and from and learn why this was necessary.  They will find out which imports could no longer be received from abroad and the effect this had on economic activity during the war.

Geography- volcanoes and earthquakes -

human and physical geog, describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including; volcanoes and earthquakes - tectonics plates, ring of fire; locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Vesuvius), develop contextual knowledge of the location of places , seas and oceans, including their defining physical and human characteristics, Northern Hemispheres,  Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, use maps, atlases, globes and digital/ computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.

Children will learn about the different layers making up the Earth and how the continents were once joined. They will look at plate tectonics and continental drift. Children will look at the location of volcanoes in the world and will learn about the Ring of Fire. They will focus on the different types of volcano and will have opportunities to label the different parts making up a volcano. They will also learn which countries are most in danger of earthquakes. Children will make their own models of a volcano and we will investigate how the build-up of pressure can cause an eruption. Children will also learn about the financial cost of natural disasters and will consider what people still choose to live in dangerous areas. By the end of the topic, children will be knowledgeable enough to compile a list of the positives and negatives of volcanic eruptions.

History

Pupils will learn about the remarkable achievements of the ancient Maya. Through these activities pupils will learn about the Maya perspective of time, the calendar system, writing, maths and the environment. In doing so they should see the stark contrast between their own history and that of the Maya. Aside from learning about Maya culture, the unit will encourage pupils to move away from the tendency in applying one’s own cultural values in judging the behaviour and beliefs of people raised in other cultures. Instead, pupils will be aware of the different (though not inferior) ways of doing things and the complexity of human life.

 

Links with Year 2 – Aztecs, Year 3 Egyptians and Year 5 Stone Age to Iron Age

 

Where and when did the Maya live?

What was Maya writing like?

How did the Maya tell the time?

What numbers did the Maya use in Maths?

How do we know about the Maya?

Did the Maya play football like us?

Goodnight Mr Tom – World War II

This unit provides children with the opportunity to look at World War II as an aspect of British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

 

World War II: whose war?

How significant was the Blitz?

What was the impact of World War II on people in our locality? 

How well does a fictional story tell us what it was like to be an evacuee?

Evacuee experiences in Britain: is this all we need to know about children in World War II?

New opportunities? How significant was the impact of World War II on women?

What did men do in World War II? Did all men have to fight?

When was the most dangerous time to live? How different was the Blitz?

On Dangerous Ground

A historical earthquake and volcanic eruption - own research

Children will learn about some of the deadliest natural disasters focusing particularly on Pompeii and how archaeologists were able to use their finds to establish how people lived at that time.

 

Make links with learning about rebuilding your life/home in the Great Fire of London in Year 2, Roman life in Year 3 and the impact of significant events from WW II in Year 6.

 

 

What was the impact of the eruption of Vesuvius?

 

What was life like in a Roman town?

What would it have been like to have been in Pompeii when the volcano erupted?

How is this event similar or different to other significant events in history that have changed people’s day-to-day lives?

Art

The Explorer

Area – sculpture mask making

Media –modroc

Artist focus – Mayan death masks

Goodnight Mr Tom

Area – Still life

Media – photography

Artist focus – iconic WWII photographs

On Dangerous Ground

Area – Painting

Media – paint and pastel

Artist focus –Lichtenstein

DT

DT -

Children will investigate cams- their shape, size and movement. Using the unit Automata Animals, they will choose an animal from the Central American Rainforest to add to a moving mechanism to illustrate part of ‘The Explorer’ story.

Generate a design from research; develop a specification, model and communicate ideas.  Produce lists of tools and materials and plans to make accurately assembled and well finished products within constraints. Compare final product to the original specification; test products with the intended user and critically evaluate the product, considering the views of others. Investigate famous manufacturing and engineering companies relevant to the project.

 

DT -

Children will investigate what a shelter is. They will work in groups to define a need for a shelter and design one using Tinkercad. They will list materials used, estimate cost, size and location.

Generate ideas and designs, developing them through analysis of shell structures and use CAD to model and communicate ideas.  Plan the making and use appropriate tools and software, explaining their choices. Use computer-generated finishing techniques.

Final product: Create their own shelter using online design programme.

 

DT -

When studying earthquakes, children to research how to make earthquake proof homes looking at properties of different materials. Children bring in knowledge of structures and materials to design a home that would withstand an earthquake. Children to also consider how to secure contents and how to add a safety aspect using pulleys that could save other people.

 

Music

Music-

Living on a prayer - How Rock music developed from the Beatles onwards. Analysing performance. Pulse (duration) - steady beat rhythm (duration) - long and short sounds over a steady beat pitch -high and low sounds

Tempo - fast and slow Dynamics- loud and quiet timbre - the character of a sound

Texture - layers of sound, how thick or thin music is Structure- how the behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about Iand contact.

Music for Christmas

 

Music-

Classroom Jazz 2

Children will learn to play parts of the tune leading up to playing the whole tune and improvising using instruments. Children will have the opportunity to compose their own tunes and perform them to an audience.

 

Old School Hip Hop

Children will learn to sing and play instruments to the Fresh Prince of Belair. They will have the opportunity to provide vocal and instrumental improvisation. Children will perform their compositions and then will compare two performances and provide critical feedback.

 

Children will learn songs and sing in large and small groups in preparation for the Easter service

Music -

Make you feel loved Pop Ballads Historical context for ballads

Pulse (duration) - steady beat rhythm (duration) - long and short sounds over a steady beat PITCH - high and low sounds Tempo - fast and slow

Dynamics - loud and quiet Timbre - the character of a sound Texture - layers of sound, how thick or thin music is Structure - how the section of a song or piece of music are ordered.

Children will learn the songs for the Summer Production.

 

PE

The Explorer

INDOOR

Boot Camp: understand how to prepare the body for exercise; understand what fitness means; complete a range of circuit-based activities and understand the reason for doing them; understand what happens to heart rate during exercise; complete a circuit that includes activities practised with balance and co-ordination.

 

Dynamic Dance (Street): identify and practise the patterns and actions in a street dance style; observe and understand the style of street dance; learn some street dance moves and devise poses; demonstrate an awareness of the music’s rhythm and phrasing when improvising; learn new moves that can be developed into a dance; to explore dance patterns and moving to the beat; add freestyle movements to the routine; create a dance that represents a street dance; know how to use expressive movements in dance to work with a partner to create a short dance phrase; create a dance as a group using any street dance moves; co-operate to adapt two routines and put them together; perform and analyse own and others’ performance; perform in front of an audience; dance as a group in time to music in a street dance style.

 

OUTDOOR

Football: demonstrate dribbling the ball when running; pass the ball accurately to other players; maintain possession of the ball during a game-like situation; aim and shoot at a goal; demonstrate effective use of attacking and defending safely; be aware of the space and how it can be used effectively when passing a ball; know the positions and rules surrounding the game of football; play in a mini football competition.

 

Invaders (Tag Rugby): understand the basic rules of tag rugby; know how to tag; work as a team, using ball-handling skills; improve spatial awareness; pass and carry a ball using balance and co-ordination; use skills learned to play a game of tag rugby; place a ball down if scoring a try; practise footwork and dodging skills when carrying the ball; reinforce catching and tagging skills and to apply them in a game; apply rules and skills learned to a game; play a mini tag rugby competition.

Goodnight Mr Tom

INDOOR

Step to the Beat: understand the value of aerobic exercise; learn how to measure heart rate and note any changes; perform aerobic activity to music; understand the value of aerobic exercise; practise and apply a sequence of step moves to the beat of the music; understand the value of step-based exercise and activities to music.

 

Gym Sequences: identify and practise gymnastic shapes and balances; identify and practise symmetrical and asymmetrical body shapes; construct sequences using balancing and linking movements; use counterbalances and incorporate them into a sequence of movements; perform movements in canon and in unison; perform and evaluate own and others’ sequences.

 

OUTDOOR

Gymfit Circuits (Personal Programme): plan a personal programme; develop a personal programme that is suitable for ability, using the knowledge and understanding gained in previous fitness sessions.

 

Nimble Nets (Tennis): demonstrate and use the correct grip of the racket and understand how to get into the ready position; use good hand/eye co-ordination to be able to contact the shuttle with the face of the racket; understand how to serve the shuttle in order to start the game, recognise the difference between the low serve and the high serve; develop children’s ability to perform and understand the ‘overhead clear’ shot and the impact that playing the overhead clear can have on winning points during game play.

 

On Dangerous Ground

INDOOR

Dodgeball: learn how to aim and throw accurately at a moving target; eliminate opponents by throwing a ball; use tactics to win; work as a team; dodge balls effectively; find a space where it will be difficult to be hit; use agility, balance and co-ordination to move quickly; catch a ball without it touching another part of your body.

 

Fitness Frenzy: complete a circuit that includes different aerobic activities; perform and devise a sequence of movements to music; understand the value of aerobic exercise, devise a sequence of step-based activities to music; plan a personal programme; perform others’ sequences with control and balance; perform a sequence of moves at each station within a circuit with increased accuracy.

 

OUTDOOR

Striking and Fielding (Rounders): throw and catch under pressure; to learn how to react quickly; demonstrate good agility and balance in order to throw accurately; use fielding skills to stop the ball effectively; learn batting control; know how to direct the ball; learn the role of backstop; play in a tournament and work as team, using tactics in order to beat another team; to assess and analyse others’ strengths.

 

Young Olympians (Athletics): investigate running styles and changes of speed; practise throwing with power and accuracy; throw safely and with understanding; demonstrate good running technique in a competitive situation; explore different footwork patterns; understand which technique is most effective when jumping for distance; utilise all the skills learned in this unit in a competitive situation.

 

RE

RE –

Christianity

Creation/Fall - Psalm 8 Children consider what David was saying about God and the World he created through Psalm 8. They identify the focus of each verse and what it is telling us. Children will understand what Psalm 8 is telling us about humans/human nature.

Children consider evidence that we are ‘a little lower than angels’.

Children discuss what God would hope to see if we were behaving as though we were ‘a little lower than angels’. They create a poster to let people know that God is coming in one year’s time and ask them for their help in getting everything ready.

People of God - How can following God bring freedom and justice?  Children are reminded of Old Testament prophets and the agreements they had with God. They learn more about the 10 Commandments and why thy would have been needed in OT times. They consider how a covenant is an agreement which works both ways. Children learn about Christianity through considering the metaphor of ‘Salt and Light’ and learn about The Five Marks of Mission. They create a visual representation of this. The children complete this unit by focusing on the fourth mark: Transform, looking at Christian Aid’s Chocolate Trading Game and considering the work of Christians who work for justice. They write a persuasive letter to champion the Toilet Twinning Project.

Incarnation - Children will know that The OT pieces together the story of the People of God. As their circumstances change they have to find new ways to follow God. They will explain connections between Matthew 21 v1-9.  They will make clear the connections between what Christians believe about Jesus as Messiah. They will weigh up how far the world needs a Messiah expressing their own insight.

During this term one class will deliver the Junior Eucharist, Harvest will be celebrated and the Christmas Service will be delivered

Judaism

Judaism - use religious words and phrases to identify features of Jewish beliefs and practises, find out about special words and what they mean (Shema and Mezuzah, Hannukah, Yom Kippur)

Understand why Jews remember the story of Esther at Purim.

Moving from child to adult through Bar Mitzvah (boys) and Bat Mizvah (girls)

The importance of the land of Israel (the ‘promised land’) for Jews and how this still causes trouble today.

RE –

Christianity

Salvation - Isaiah 53 and John 19 Children explain connections between theses readings and the key concepts of Messiah, Sacrifice and Salvation. They take account of the contexts and compare their ideas with ways in which Christians interpret these texts as showing the idea of Jesus as a sacrifice.

The children make clear the connection between the Christian concept of the sacrifice of Jesus and how Christians follow Jesus example in giving themselves for others.

Children weigh up how far the idea of sacrifice and the example of Jesus are inspiring in the world today and in their own thinking

Children will also take part in an Easter service this term.

Humanism

Living as a Humanist - Children will understand the of Humanism using materials meaning provided by Understanding Humanism. They will discuss and form an understanding of the key humanist beliefs and ideas: People are what matters in life

The Golden Rule-Treat others as you would like them to treat you

You can live without religion

Science provides the most reliable source of knowledge about the world.

The children will learn about some Humanist ceremonies (naming ceremonies, weddings etc) and compare them to Christian ones.

 They will learn about some well- known Humanists and listen to the views of ordinary Humanist about their faith.

Research a recent or contemporary example of someone who exemplifies humanist values and a humanist approach to life. (e.g. Fenner Brockway, Richard Dawkins, David Attenborough, Michael Rosen)

 

RE –

Christianity

Pentecost- Children will take part in celebrations of Pentecost and understand its significance as part of the church curriculum.

 

Kingdom of God- What kind of king is Jesus?

Children will explain connections between The Parable of the Unforgiving Servant (Matthew 18: 21-35) and the concept of the Kingdom of God- where God rules human lives.

They will make clear connections between belief in the Kingdom of God and how Christians put their beliefs into practice, for example through receiving and practising forgiveness.

They will identify ideas arising from their study of the Kingdom of God and comment on how far these are helpful or inspiring for the world today, justifying their responses.

 

One class will lead the Junior Eucharist this term. Confirmation classes run for those children who wish to take part.

PSHE

PSHE –  Being Me in My World

Celebrating Difference: explain ways in which difference can be a source of conflict or a cause of celebration and can show empathy with people in either situation

PSHE – Dreams and Goals: describe some ways in which I can work with other people to help make the world a better place, identify why I am motivated to do this

Healthy Me: evaluate when alcohol is being used responsibly, antisocially or being misused, tell you how I feel about using alcohol when I am older and my reason for this

PSHE – Relationships: recognise when people are trying to gain power or control, demonstrate ways I could stand up for myself and my friends in situations where others are trying to gain power or control

Changing Me: describe how a baby develops from conception through the nine months of pregnancy, and how it is born and recognise how I feel when I reflect on the development and birth of a baby

 

Computing

E-Safety

We are App planners & associated units

Children analyse what GPS is and use this to create their own location based app. They then focus on promoting their app using vlog (youtuber style).

 

Final product: Creating a powerpoint presentation for an app. Create a vlog (youtube) to promote their app.

 

E-Safety

We are Cryptographers

Children will learn how to use Morse code and create videos to crack and make their own codes.

 

Final product: Create a video for their partner using code.

 

Creating shelters in Tinkercad, linked to WW2

Design a shelter for a purpose and discuss computer aided design. They create their shelter using either Paint 3D or Tinkercad.

 

Final product: Create their own shelter using online design programme.

E-Safety

We are animators

Children will be taught the story of Pompeii. They will create their own characters out of plasticine for their animation. Create an animation and include speech over the top of the animation.

 

 

Final product: Making an animation using plasticine to retell the story of Pompeii.

 

French

  • To be familiar with classroom routines and instructional language, giving information appropriately in French eg. answering the register (Je suis presente / Il est absent.); stating the date (C’est le mardi 8 octobre.); describing the weather (Il fait gris.); asking for classroom objects.
  • To learn classroom vocabulary including: ‘un stylo, un crayon, une gomme, un taille-crayon, des ciseaux, un cahier, un sac’.
  • To revise the question ‘As tu ….? and the two possible responses: ‘J’ai’ and ‘Je n’ai pas de’.
  • To revise clothes vocabulary from Year 4 and learn the following new words: des chaussures, des chaussettes, un sweat, une cravate.
  • To be able to express and justify opinions using phrases such as: ‘j’aime, je n’aime pas, je n’aime pas le rouge, ‘c’est laid, c’est moche, c’est super, c’est joli’.
  • To revise vocabulary about family members; to extend descriptions of them using the terms: ‘Il s’appelle, Il a dix ans, ‘Il est, Il habite a’.
  • To recap the adjectives: plus, sympa, intelligent, amusant.
  • To revise the forms of the verb ‘etre’.
  • To learn the French words for some common occupations including: medecin, ‘vendeur/vendeuse, serveur/serveuse, agent de police, professeur’.
  • To practise and perform a song entitled ‘Le divin enfant’.

 

  • To learn words associated with where you live and the rooms in a house including: ‘j’habite dans, j’habite a, une maison, un appartement. un salon, une salle a manger, une cuisine, une salle de bains, un garage, un balcon, un jardin, une chambre, une fenetre, une piscine’.
  • To recap adjectives taught so far plus: ‘superbe, magnifique, immense, deluxe, en haut, en bas’.
  • To understand the gist of a short text recognising familiar vocabulary.
  • To learn the prepositions: ‘sur’ and ‘sous’.
  • To develop conversational language: ‘Repete s’il te plait, Repetez s’il vous plait, ‘Qu’est-ce que c’est en francais?’
  • To learn some furniture words in French including: ‘une chaise, un divan, une table, un frigo, une chaine hi-fi, une douche, un micr-ondes, un tapis, une lampe’.
  • To revise days of the week and months of the year.

 

  • To learn simple future tense: ‘Je vais …’

PROJECT (to be completed over several weeks):

  • To work with a partner to plan a holiday to France and describe it to an audience using words/phrases like: ‘On va aller, on va partir, on va rester dans un hotel, on va rester dans un appartement, on va rester dans un gite, on va rester dans un camping, on va prendre’.
  • To select a means of transport: revising the following vocabulary from Year 4: ‘en bateau, en avion, en voiture, en train’.
  • To find places to visit using the internet and add these to their plan using phrases such as: ‘On va visiter, on va regarder, ‘d’abord, plus tard’.
  • To write a programme of activities for a week on holiday using the future tense and some of the following vocabulary: ‘ le muse, le chateau, la plage, le zoo, le jardin publique, la piscine, le centre commercial, le parc d’attractions, un match de’.
  • To revise and memorise vocabulary and phrases learnt over the year.

 

Top